Category Archives: Incontinence Treatment

Blog Posts written by Wearever Incontinence offering some treatment ideas for Incontinence

5 Myths About Incontinence: Busted

incontinence factsThere are a lot of misconceptions about incontinence. It can be hard to tell where the truth lies. So, whether you’re living with incontinence or caring for someone who is, check out a few debunked myths to help you keep the facts straight:

1. Myth: To avoid urinary leaks, don’t drink much water.

  • Reality: It is still very important to consume enough fluids to stay hydrated. Instead, consider drinking water at times when you know you will have easy access to a nearby restroom. It’s also recommended people living with incontinence limit food and drinks that can acerbate incontinence symptoms such as alcoholic beverages, caffeine and acidic foods.

2. Myth: Surgery is the only option for treating urinary incontinence.

  • Reality: In addition to surgery, there are also other treatment options for incontinence, including medication, exercise, and diet modification and lifestyle changes. The Mayo Clinic shared this extensive list of treatment options to evaluate what may work best for you with your own physician

3. Myth: Urinary incontinence or leakage isn’t something I need to bring up with my doctor.

4. Adult diapers or sanitary napkins are the only option for adults with urinary incontinence.

  • Reality: You are not bound to the crinkly, bulky and uncomfortable disposable products. Wearever offers an alternative – real underwear featuring a sewn-in super absorbent Unique-dri™ pad, which traps liquid for built-in, all-day protection. These incontinence panties and men’s incontinence briefs are comfortable, look and feel just like traditional underwear while providing protection for leaks.

5. Myth: Incontinence only occurs in seniors.

  • Reality: While urinary incontinence is common in older adults, it can affect men and women of any age. Incontinence in women can occur during and immediately after pregnancy. Additionally, a number of other health concerns are associated with urinary incontinence, including ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. There are an estimated 30 million Americans living with some level of urinary incontinence.

Have more questions about incontinence? Check out our FAQ page for additional information!

Tips for Supporting Female Teenage Incontinence

female teenage incontinenceThe teenage years are already full of awkwardness and turmoil for young girls. Unfortunately, when you add incontinence to the mix, this time can become even more challenging. Teenage girls who suffer from incontinence may experience more anxiety and depression than girls who don’t struggle with this condition. In addition, incontinence can also cause embarrassing situations for girls, which may prevent them from wanting to participate in sports or even spend time socializing with peers.  Continue reading

Ease the Discomfort of Overflow Incontinence

overflow incontinenceCould the discomfort you’re experiencing be caused by overflow incontinence? Overflow incontinence is a type of urinary incontinence (lacking control over the bladder) that involves your bladder not being able to fully empty itself. The result is trickles of urine that happens fairly often. The University of Maryland Medical Center explains that there are numerous causes and risk factors for this condition, including:  Continue reading

Should I Be Worried About Constant Urination?

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How To Combat The Constant Urge To Urinate

Frequent urination doesn’t have to be indicative of a health problem. For some people, frequent urination is simply be the result of drinking more than necessary. However, in some cases frequent urination can be a symptom of something else. Knowing why you urinate frequently and what to do about it can help you stay healthy and can even improve your quality of life. Continue reading

Fighting Against The Constant Urge to Urinate

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Urge incontinence, also known as overactive bladder (OAB) is the frequent and sudden urge to urinate followed by an involuntary voiding of the bladder. Urge incontinence may occur for a variety of reasons, and people who experience this problem should seek diagnosis and treatment of their condition from a medical professional. Continue reading

Talking With Your Doctor About Incontinence

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Dealing with incontinence is an option. Many men and women suffering from incontinence feel there’s nothing that can be done and often think they just need to live with the condition. That’s rarely the case. The first step is to speak to a doctor about the condition, learn why it is happening, and then learn what can be done about it. Continue reading

Stress Incontinence: What Is It and What Causes It?

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There are various different types and degrees of incontinence, or the unintentional leakage of urine. But the most common type of incontinence in women – and one of the most common types of incontinence overall – is stress incontinence. Stress incontinence occurs when a small amount of urine escapes during an activity that places pressure on the bladder like coughing, sneezing or lifting.  Continue reading

Dealing With Incontinence At Work

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It is estimated that incontinence affects 25 million Americans. Many people find that their incontinence can impact every part of daily living, including workweek management. With careful preparation, muscle training exercises and by making calculated behavioral changes, working people can manage their incontinence without experiencing embarrassing incidents at the workplace.  Continue reading

Worst Treatment Methods and Ideas for Incontinence

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According to the Illinois Department of Public Health, about 13 million Americans suffer from incontinence. Sadly, while there are plenty of viable treatment methods available for people with incontinence, only about one in every 12 people will actually seek medical attention for this condition. Instead, they make the mistake of trying to treat the symptoms of incontinence themselves, believing some (or all) of the following incontinence treatment myths. Continue reading