Category Archives: Incontinence Treatment

Blog Posts written by Wearever Incontinence offering some treatment ideas for Incontinence

The vSculpt May Help Women With Stress Incontinence

female-incontinenceAs we enter into the new year, doctors and medical researchers are discovering more and more ways to treat and relieve stress incontinence in both men and women. In their research, they noticed that stress incontinence and forms of sexual dysfunction are quite common in many women and even–on occasion–go hand in hand with one another. However, in the past few years, doctors have discovered a plethora of ways to treat both of these common afflictions, allowing women to find the reprieve they so desperately need and, ultimately, improving their overall quality of life.

A Common Occurrence In Women

Currently, 40% of women will experience some form of urinary incontinence at one point in their life, with the most common form being stress incontinence. Leaks from stress incontinence typically occur from coughing, sneezing, or from different forms of exercise or for many women, after childbirth.

As women age, urinary leakage tends to get worse, especially after menopause. To correct this troublesome issue, many doctors tend to recommend two different forms of treatment; conservative treatment such as lifestyle changes, weight loss, or medication, pelvic floor exercises or a more intense treatment course such as surgery.

Although pelvic floor exercises yield the highest results, it requires the training and monitoring of a physician or physical therapist to ensure that the patient is executing them properly. However, in light of the high demands of the NHS, many physiotherapists are overworked and boast long waiting lists and follow-up lists, which proves to be a problem for patients who desperately need help in controlling their urinary incontinence problems.

The vSculpt May Help

Due to the sheer number of women that deal with the issue, there have been recent  developments of medical devices that assist women with incontinence, with the latest device being the vSculpt.

The vSculpt is a device that’s inserted vaginally and uses multi-modal technology to improve the strength of a woman’s pelvic floor muscles. To do this, the vSculpt uses a combination of light therapy, heat, and therapeutic vibration. This combination works to restore both the tissue and the muscle of the pelvic floor and promotes better control over leaks and natural lubrication; both of which can help to improve not only urinary incontinence, but minor forms of sexual dysfunction as well.

To support this claim, the International Urogynecology Journal published a study that was conducted by doctors of Seattle, Washington. This study evaluated the patients who used the vSculpt for 45 days, 55 women total. At the end of the study, researchers examined the results by using a 1-hour pad weight test, pelvic floor muscle strength test, and a series of questionnaires that looked into the patient’s quality of life–with a concentration in stress incontinence and sexual function issues. Their studies yield significantly high results and showed that with this new device, women actually saw a vast improvement in both their urinary incontinence and sexual function problems, significantly improving their overall quality of life.

With these results, more and more doctors around the country are recommending the vSculpt as a minimally invasive treatment for urinary incontinence.

vSculpt is not available yet in the U.S, but you can learn more information about it here.

New Incontinence Drug May Improve Sleep Quality

sleep-quality

In recent news, researchers at the University of California-San Francisco discovered a new drug that could inhibit the occurrence of urinary incontinence in women while greatly improving their quality of sleep. Those who suffer from urinary incontinence understand that this is an affliction that ceases to subside, no matter the time of day. Even in the deepest of sleep, episodes of incontinence can occur. Due to this, maintaining a regimented sleep cycle proves to be very difficult. Now, with the discovery of the new drug, fesoterodine, women who have incontinence will be able to rest easy at night knowing that their incontinence is being treated.

Putting Incontinence to Rest

Incontinence is a very common issue for women; especially those who have suffered frequent bladder infections, have given birth, are menopausal, or have a weakened bladder due to old age.

Due to its uncontrollable nature, many women’s sleep patterns are disrupted and their quality of life is greatly reduced. Leslee Subak, MD, professor and chair of obstetrics and gynecology states, “Two of the biggest quality-of-life factors for older women are poor sleep quality and incontinence, and the older you get, the more prevalent both conditions are, and they do seem to be correlated. And so, if we can find a drug to treat one and effectively decrease the other, too, that could be big for improving quality of life.” Luckily, with the determination from scientists and doctors from UCSF, that treatment has been made possible.

Back in 2012, researchers at the University of California-San Francisco conducted a study that looked into the effects a certain drug had on reducing the episodes of incontinence. Since incontinence is 5-10 times more common in women than men, researchers decided to revolve the study around women with incontinence. In their research, they discovered that the drug, fesoterodine, decreased the number of incontinence accidents while reducing the number of time participants woke up in the middle of the night to urinate. Fesoterodine is an antimuscarinic which helps to control accidental urination by blocking the receptors in the bladder.

Killing Two Birds With One Stone

Since fesoterodine proved to be efficient in preventing incidences of incontinence, researchers wanted to take it a step further and determine if it had beneficial effects for sleeping. To produce accurate results, researchers had their participants take part in a sleep evaluation, first–the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index is a self-reported evaluation that measures sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, the amount of time it takes for an individual to fall asleep at night, as well as 4 other sleep factors. Each category is scaled from 0 to 3 and totaled together at the end. Typically, the higher the score, the poorer the sleep quality–ranging from a score of 5 or more. In their study, they found that 57% of their participants recorded poor sleeping habits with an average score of 6.4. However, the women who were taking fesoterodine each night reported that slept much more soundly; only waking up to urinate once per night, if at all.

Since incontinence affects 25% of women who are in their 20’s and 30’s, 50% of women who are menopausal, and 80% of women who are 80 and up, the newly discovered medicinal effects fesoterodine has on sleep patterns and incontinence is truly groundbreaking. Not only will this new course of treatment help to soothe incontinence in women while bettering their sleep patterns, it will greatly increase their overall quality of life.  

New Device In UK To Help Women With Stress Incontinence

stress-incontinence

Did you know that in the United Kingdom alone, nearly 3 million women are afflicted with stress incontinence? Unfortunately, many of these women are too embarrassed by their problem and will not seek help for it. Lucky, the UK just developed a new device that can help women fight the stigma that follows being diagnosed with stress incontinence.

The Pessary That Can Change It All

Just a few weeks ago, the Scottish Fitness Expo released their new pessary called URESTA. URESTA is a small, reusable, rubber weight that has a shape of a bell. The purpose of URESTA is for women to use it as a way to successfully manage their symptoms of incontinence and avoid the tiresome, and embarrassing leaks that can occur throughout the day.

Women insert URESTA inside their pelvic region and use it throughout the day in everything they do; they can even exercise with it! Although URESTA is not very heavy, it provides women with enough weight to strengthen their bladder muscles as they use it, allowing for little to no urine to escape. Since URESTA is made primarily of rubber, it can easily be washed.

Urogynecologist Developed and Recommended

Originally designed and produced by Canadian urogynecologist, Scott Farrell, URESTA is currently being used by over 10,000 woman in Canada, alone.  Farrell made the prototype of URESTA out of plasticine from–surprisingly enough–his daughter’s toy box! Here’s what he had to say about his thought process for the creation of URESTA, “I had a patient a few years ago who was a bagpipe-player who leaked when she played. The pessary stopped it and she was able to continue in competition” (Source). So naturally, he then began to think of ways that the pessary could actually come in use for women.

Many of Dr. Farrell’s patients have experienced much success in improving their incontinence through the use of the pessary, URESTA. One woman even claimed that she was able to take part in all the activities she used to be able to do before the birth of her daughter. She claimed that she used URESTA almost every single day and it truly helped her regain much of the strength she needed in her bladder muscles.

Wael Agur, a urogyneocologist from Ayrshire and Arran, claimed that he as well gave URESTA to his patients with stress incontinence to use. Agur loves recommending this to women due to the simple fact that it provides these women with relief. Many are very embarrassed to share this problem with their doctor with fear that it means they will need dramatic surgery. However, this is not the case at all, and hopefully, with the development of URESTA, more and more women will be inclined to speak up to their doctor and share the issues they are dealing with involving stress incontinence.

In addition, the pessary is very much a self-managing tool, so women won’t have to make frequent doctors visits to check on their progress unless they really have a desire to.Not only does this inconspicuous and handy pessary help women to strengthen their bladder muscles, but it also provides them with the confidence they so rightly deserve.

Wearever Incontinence Products Help

While URESTA is an amazing development that may make it to the US, there are many ways to deal with incontinence currently. At Wearever, we pride ourselves on offering the best incontinence products for men and women. Check out our incontinence panties, incontinence briefs, and reusable bed pads for reliable protection.

Kegel Exercises Just Got A Lot More Fun

kegel-exercises

Kegels are an exercise that most women participate in order to manage their incontinence and strengthen their bladders. It’s a common misconception that Kegels are only done by women who have recently given birth as a way to strengthen their vaginal walls; however, this exercise is actually very commonly used to ease the symptoms of stress and urge incontinence.

Just recently, a new program has hit the shelves that are turning Kegels into a less boring and more fun exercise to take part in.

A Fun New Way to Complete Your Kegels

For those who are unfamiliar with Kegels or lead a very busy life, it can be hard to keep up with the exercise and remember the reps and counts you are supposed to do each day. Even for those who are very dedicated to building up their bladder strength by using a vaginal weight have trouble keeping up with the demands of the exercise–not to mention these small and sometimes expensive weights have a tendency to get misplaced far too often.

Now, a new Kegel exercise companion is on the market that is changing the way women are doing Kegels while promoting an altogether stronger vaginal wall and bladder.

Introducing the Perifit

The Perifit is a brand new, pelvic floor trainer that has the ability to send a Bluetooth signal to its accompanying app on your phone. When turned on, the app allows you play a fun video game that assists you in your Kegel exercises. And for those who are not tech savvy, don’t fret, because this trainer and app are very simple to use. The device itself is moderately sized and inconspicuous; lightweight and only 4 inches in length. It also comes with a small travel case and a guide to help new users get the hang of it. Once you have downloaded the app onto your phone, you will be able to choose the type of program that best fits your needs–i.e post-pregnancy, intimate well-being, and incontinence. From there, it will put together a 5-day treatment regimen based on your preferences.

The awesome part about this device is that the app is wired to your trainer. So, the games you are playing while using the device, are actually simulating it to move within you vaginal wall; helping you navigate the Kegel exercises. With each game you play, the tokens you collect, and levels you master, the device with expanding and contract, teaching you the ways of performing proper Kegels and therefore promoting ultimate bladder strength. Due to its small size and inconspicuous shape, this device is fairly simple to use when you are on the go. Many women even claim to use it while they are out and about and even wearing a skirt–however, we recommend that you only do this once you’ve mastered the Kegel technique.

 

Is The O-Shot Effective Against Incontinence?

Urinary incontinence transpires when a person’s urinary sphincter grows weak and in turn, leads to involuntary, and unexpected leakage of urine on a daily basis. This is a problem that affects many people but occurs most frequently in women of all ages. Though incontinence is highly prevalent in the elderly, it can also affect women who have experienced pregnancy, menopause, and other related medical conditions.

According to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 25% of premenopausal women, 50% of middle-aged women or postmenopausal women, and 75% of elderly women suffer from incontinence. With such a high percentage of women suffering from incontinence, researchers have estimated that nearly $19.5 billion has been spent on a plethora of treatments, including surgery, in the effort to reduce the symptoms.

Just recently, a new treatment for stress incontinence was discovered and doctors are calling it the O-Shot. This new treatment has peaked the interest in many women who are plagued by incontinence and are in search for any means necessary to end their involuntary leaks.  

How the O-Shot Works

incontinence-o-shot

The O-Shot is an injection that is made from platelet-rich plasma that is directly taken from the patient’s blood and spun together. Due to its properties and yellow hue, doctors are calling the plasma, ‘liquid gold’. A doctor starts by drawing blood from the patient’s arm and place it in a centrifuge. After time, the centrifuge separates the red blood cells from the plasma.

Dr. Beverly Mikes explains that the plasma produced is rich with growth factors that promote cells to increase their production of elastin–a protein found in the dermis of the skin–collagen, and vasculature and nerves (Source). The plasma then helps to regenerate and stimulate new tissue which in turn, treats stress incontinence.

Once this process is completed, the doctor administers a topical numbing cream followed by an injection of a local anesthetic and injects four cc’s of the liquid gold into the vaginal wall and the remaining 1 cc into the clitoris. Women who have received this treatment must keep in mind that results are not immediate and any signs of noticeable improvement may take a while.

A data bank maintained by the O-Shot’s founder Dr. Charles Runels has shown that there is a 65% success rate within three months of the injection. If there are still no signs of improvement within the three months, doctors recommend that the patient receive a second shot. The data bank notes an 85% success rate for those who were administered a second shot.

For women who have experienced reduced incontinence symptoms in the O-Shot treatment, it is recommended to receive yearly injections. Currently, a single treatment of the O-Shot is priced at $1,500 and is not covered by insurance. 

 

Not Enough Research

Like any experimental branch of medicine that has been newly discovered, questions and controversy have followed the development of the O-Shot.

As eager as many women are to try out this new treatment, the lack of peer-reviewed scientific evidence is leaving many questioning its effectiveness and its level of risk. Unfortunately, due to the insufficient scientific data, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have yet to include the O-Shot treatment in its Practice Bulletin for Urinary Incontinence in Women. Obstetricians and Gynecologists are advising their patients to heed caution to the O-Shot due to the placebo effect. Many women who suffer from urinary incontinence are very embarrassed to admit that they have this problem–even though it is more common than most believe it to be. Because of this, there is a heightened chance of the placebo effect occurring. Sometimes, all it takes is one woman’s positive testimony of the procedure to convince the rest that the treatment will work just as well for them. Hopefully, as time passes and more research is conducted, obstetricians and gynecologists can officially deem the O-Shot as an effective treatment for urinary incontinence.

There Are Many Ways To Manage Incontinence

Until more research is done, doctors recommend that patients practice pelvic muscle training to make your bladder and pelvic muscles strong enough to stop an unexpected leakage. Surgery, medication, and behavior therapy are recommended to those with extreme and debilitating cases of incontinence.

For extra protection from incontinence, we at Wearever have the all the supplies you need. Our incontinence underwear for men and incontinence panties are discrete, durable, fashionable, economically priced, and can go right in the wash after each use. For overnight protection, Wearever has a selection of washable bed pads to choose from that are long-lasting and will keep your bed dry. Wearever has you covered from those unexpected leaks.  

Exercise And a New App To Help With Incontinence

Incontinence is an issue that over 25 million adult Americans deal with. Although the condition does not have any adverse affects on health, it is an inconvenience and can interfere with daily life as well as hinder social life. People that suffer from incontinence often withdraw themselves from social activity as a result of feeling embarrassed or ashamed of their condition. Luckily, there are various incontinence products on the market that are designed to help those affected lead normal everyday lives without having the worry of leakage being visibly apparent.

Improve Incontinence Within 8 Weeks

There is a revolutionary way in which incontinence is being managed and improved and it is in the form of the PeriCoach mobile app. This app acts as a coach and instructor, including an exercise challenge for those with incontinence which lasts eight weeks long. The PeriCoach system helps to improve incontinence along with a better quality of life.The developer of the app states that approximately 70 percent of females discovered that a structured and tailored program was beneficial in improving incontinence symptoms.

The eight-week challenge incorporates a virtual pelvic floor coach. PeriCoach works in conjunction with your workout equipment in order to strengthen your abdomen muscles, reducing the symptoms that are associated with incontinence. By partaking in the program for just a few minutes every day, incontinence patients can manage stress incontinence. Many individuals are unaware that by simply working out your pelvic and abdomen muscles, the strength of those muscles which are responsible for incontinence get stronger and stronger. This in turn reduces leakage over time.

Wearever Incontinence Products

At Wearever, our goal is to provide incontinence sufferers with the most effective and durable products that money can buy. Check out our selection of incontinence panties, incontinence briefs, and incontinence bed pads.

The Effective Ways Seniors Can Treat Incontinence Issues

incontinence-treatment-for-seniors

There’s no shame in experiencing incontinence; it can happen to anyone. From the bubbly teenager who drank a little too much water, to the mom who had her first baby, to the elderly man whose bladder isn’t as strong as it used to be, incontinence isn’t as uncommon as you may think. 

If incontinence is a personal a struggle for you, there are plenty of treatment methods to consider

What to do First?

The best course of action would be to see a doctor. By making an appointment with your doctor, they will be able to determine if the incontinence that you are experiencing is stress incontinence, if you leak unexpectedly, or urge incontinence. Once the distinction is made, you can be set up on a proper treatment plan.

Find a Treatment Plan That Works For You

Depending on the severity of incontinence, you can choose from non-drug therapies and standard medications.

Some non-drug therapies include Kegel exercises, and bladder training–keeping a log of urination and accidents while increasing the time between using the bathroom.

Studies also show that cutting back on drinking alcoholic and caffeinated beverages can help lower incontinence rates. It may also help to get a sufficient amount of fiber in your daily diet and try to maintain a healthy diet (Source). For women with stress incontinence, a pessary can prove to be very helpful. A pessary devices shaped as a ring that you can insert to lift and support your bladder

Incontinence Medications

There are many medications that are approved for incontinence, mostly urge incontinence. With the guidance of your doctor, you can be prescribed Myrbetriq, Ditropan XL or its generic brand, Vesicare, and Detrol or the generic version as well (Source). Though these medications were specifically created for incontinence, they are not for everyone as there are many common side effects (constipation, drowsiness, dry mouth, blurry vision and dizziness).

Many of these side effects have led to patients discontinuing the use of them. If these medications aren’t for you, you also have the option to get Botox injected into your bladder to help tighten the muscles, but please advise your doctor first before making any decisions.

Natural Incontinence Remedies

For more natural remedies, try taking magnesium supplements or Vitamin D.

  • Magnesium is a mineral known for its assistance with nerve and muscle function. A small study revealed that more than half of the women who took magnesium hydroxide pills twice a day had improvements with their incontinence problems.
  • Vitamin D has also proved to be a useful supplement for incontinence. Another study showed that women between the ages of 20 and older who had normal vitamin D levels were less likely to have an incontinence disorder

Electrical Stimulation To Treat Incontinence

Electrical stimulation is another treatment for incontinence patients. During this process, mild electric shocks are directed into the lower back or the pelvic area. This stimulation can strengthen the muscles that are involved in urination. Electrical stimulation has proven to be helpful for both urge and stress incontinence (Source).

Incontinence Supplies “Wearever” You Need Them

While you are searching for the perfect treatment that will help with your incontinence, we have you covered. At Wearever, we supply quality incontinence products for both men and women. Our incontinence briefs and incontinence panties that are easily affordable, durable, and discrete. 

Stop worrying about accidents while you sleep and check out our incontinence bed pads as well!

 

 

Staying Fit May Help Reduce the Risk of Incontinence in Women

incontinence-in-women

What if you could take precautionary measures that would reduce your risk of incontinence and better manage it? Women generally have weaker pelvic muscles than males which means they are more susceptible to dealing with incontinence. Through working out and staying fit, women can discover that as their muscles strengthen, so does the reduction of incontinence issues.

The Study

In a recent study conducted, almost 1,500 elderly females who suffered from stress or urge incontinence were surveyed. The results of the three-year long study concluded that women who kept their weight down and partook in muscle-strengthening exercises experienced lower amounts of incontinence incidents (Source). Whether it is yoga, pilates, light jogging, or swimming, staying fit and working your pelvic muscles lessens the chance of incontinence issues. As women work these muscles out, they are strengthening the muscles around the urethra and bladder, making it less likely for unexpected urine to pass through.

Managing Your Weight Helps

Having an overactive bladder is a common issue that many women face. Through taking your weight and active lifestyle into your own hands, you can better manage the side effects of incontinence.

Studies have proven that managing BMI (Body Mass Index) and keeping those numbers in check, is inherently beneficial to managing incontinence. The unnecessary weight that is put on the pelvic muscles adds additional pressure to the area. In turn, the chance of incontinence is heightened, and leakage is more likely to incur. “By reducing weight and abdominal fat there is less pressure on the bladder resulting in less stress urinary incontinence,” said Dr. Cindy Amundsen of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. “Better muscle strength may be associated with higher pelvic floor muscle strength and function, decreasing the susceptibility to urine leakage” (Source).

Daily urinary incontinence affects nearly 12 percent of women ages 60-64 in America: that is significant. By making some lifestyle alterations, women can better manage their incontinence. Walking more, eating less, and breathing in the fresh air are all easy, simple, and enjoyable ways to control leakage. Urinary incontinence is a widespread grievance among many women and through keeping your BMI and health in check, you can better manage this issue. Beneficial alterations in one’s body composition will keep you living a long and prosperous life.

Wearever Incontinence Products Help With the Unexpected

Even when you are trying your best in preventing urine accidents, leakage may still occur unexpectedly. Wearever incontinence panties provide protection that you can always rely on in. Wearever incontinence bed pads also work effectively in preventing any accidents while you sleep from ruining your bed.

Botox Is Helping Women With Incontinence

botox-for-incontinence

Female incontinence occurs when muscles around the bladder are weak, which is why doctors recommend that kegel exercises be done to strengthen the base of one’s core in order to have better control of one’s muscles. Another method that has achieved success is neural stimulation – a process by which one’s neural network is stimulated in order to increase the activity around the bladder and kidneys, giving those who suffer from the condition better control of the area.

But a new treatment, botox, may actually be better than neural stimulation. The results found in a study by Dr. Cindy Amundsen of Duke University, published on October 4th, may provide an alternative course of treatment to women suffering from incontinence. The treatment is not without its side effects, however, but its beneficent promises – as well as the findings of the study – are explored in greater detail here.

The Population Studied

The study took place between February 2012 to January 2015. It involved 381 women at 9 medical centers in the United States. These women were recorded to have at least six urgency incontinence episodes over three consecutive days; they were in this study because other lesser treatments (like reducing water and coffee intake, doing kegel exercises, etc.) had not helped. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either sacral neuromodulation or a 200 unit injection of onabotulinumtoxinA (botox). 189 received the former while 192 received the latter. The average age of each participant was 63 years.

The Results

This landmark study served as the first randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of two FDA approved methods for female incontinence; the first being nerve stimulation – which must be done with surgery, and the second being botox – which is less invasive and can be done with injections.

“What we have learned from the study is the treatments are both good and it will just help inform physicians and patients who are trying to make a decision between these two therapies,” Amundsen said in an interview with NBC. Both treatments proved to be statistically significant and both helped women overcome the symptoms associated with urinary incontinence.

Female incontinence, which affects between 25 to 45 percent of all women is one of the most common conditions worldwide. However, the embarrassment caused by this issue leads many women to under report their symptoms and conditions to their doctor. Interestingly, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases, which is part of the National Institute of Health, remarked that women experience urinary incontinence twice as often as men (Source). The reasons are many, including pregnancy, childbirth, menopause, as well as the anatomical layout of a woman’s female urinary tract.

A DIfferent Kind Of Botox Treatment

So what does this mean for women that may want to get botox? How does the treatment work exactly – does one go in for a face, chin and neck touch-up and come out of the doctor’s office with lessened urinary incontinence urges? Not exactly.

Side Effects

Dr. Amundsen explains that the botox treatment is not superior to the nerve stimulator, otherwise known as InterStim, rather the two methods both provide beneficent effects and come with their own side effects. It will be up to the individual and their doctor to choose which treatment is right for them.
Although botox appeared to work slightly better than the InterStim, women given botox had a greater risk of urinary tract infections. Botox did increase the risk of UTIs and need for self catheterizations. Botox patients had a risk of UTI of 35 percent, compared to 11 percent when compared to the InterStim.

Cost

Readers may be wondering as to the cost of these two procedures, however, the study didn’t compare the cost of the treatments. Luckily they are both covered by insurance, including Medicare.

For a low cost solution that is less invasive, women should consider incontinence panties. Incontinence panties, unlike disposables last up to 200 washes. Alternating between two pairs can keep you dry for a year – without having to look bulky in adult underwear or diapers.

Conclusion

For women that desire less intrusive incontinence solutions, we recommend opting for our incontinence panties and incontinence bed pads. The researchers of the Duke University study will need to follow their 381 participants for two more years in order to obtain exact data on which solution is most cost effective, however, we here at Wearever already have the data in! If you’re looking for ways to manage your urinary incontinence, you can’t find a lower-prices product than Wearever brand incontinence underwear.

 

5 Myths About Incontinence: Busted

incontinence factsThere are a lot of misconceptions about incontinence. It can be hard to tell where the truth lies. So, whether you’re living with incontinence or caring for someone who is, check out a few debunked myths to help you keep the facts straight:

1. Myth: To avoid urinary leaks, don’t drink much water.

  • Reality: It is still very important to consume enough fluids to stay hydrated. Instead, consider drinking water at times when you know you will have easy access to a nearby restroom. It’s also recommended people living with incontinence limit food and drinks that can acerbate incontinence symptoms such as alcoholic beverages, caffeine and acidic foods.

2. Myth: Surgery is the only option for treating urinary incontinence.

  • Reality: In addition to surgery, there are also other treatment options for incontinence, including medication, exercise, and diet modification and lifestyle changes. The Mayo Clinic shared this extensive list of treatment options to evaluate what may work best for you with your own physician

3. Myth: Urinary incontinence or leakage isn’t something I need to bring up with my doctor.

4. Adult diapers or sanitary napkins are the only option for adults with urinary incontinence.

  • Reality: You are not bound to the crinkly, bulky and uncomfortable disposable products. Wearever offers an alternative – real underwear featuring a sewn-in super absorbent Unique-dri™ pad, which traps liquid for built-in, all-day protection. These incontinence panties and men’s incontinence briefs are comfortable, look and feel just like traditional underwear while providing protection for leaks.

5. Myth: Incontinence only occurs in seniors.

  • Reality: While urinary incontinence is common in older adults, it can affect men and women of any age. Incontinence in women can occur during and immediately after pregnancy. Additionally, a number of other health concerns are associated with urinary incontinence, including ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. There are an estimated 30 million Americans living with some level of urinary incontinence.

Have more questions about incontinence? Check out our FAQ page for additional information!