Tag Archives: incontinence management

New Incontinence Drug May Improve Sleep Quality

sleep-quality

In recent news, researchers at the University of California-San Francisco discovered a new drug that could inhibit the occurrence of urinary incontinence in women while greatly improving their quality of sleep. Those who suffer from urinary incontinence understand that this is an affliction that ceases to subside, no matter the time of day. Even in the deepest of sleep, episodes of incontinence can occur. Due to this, maintaining a regimented sleep cycle proves to be very difficult. Now, with the discovery of the new drug, fesoterodine, women who have incontinence will be able to rest easy at night knowing that their incontinence is being treated.

Putting Incontinence to Rest

Incontinence is a very common issue for women; especially those who have suffered frequent bladder infections, have given birth, are menopausal, or have a weakened bladder due to old age.

Due to its uncontrollable nature, many women’s sleep patterns are disrupted and their quality of life is greatly reduced. Leslee Subak, MD, professor and chair of obstetrics and gynecology states, “Two of the biggest quality-of-life factors for older women are poor sleep quality and incontinence, and the older you get, the more prevalent both conditions are, and they do seem to be correlated. And so, if we can find a drug to treat one and effectively decrease the other, too, that could be big for improving quality of life.” Luckily, with the determination from scientists and doctors from UCSF, that treatment has been made possible.

Back in 2012, researchers at the University of California-San Francisco conducted a study that looked into the effects a certain drug had on reducing the episodes of incontinence. Since incontinence is 5-10 times more common in women than men, researchers decided to revolve the study around women with incontinence. In their research, they discovered that the drug, fesoterodine, decreased the number of incontinence accidents while reducing the number of time participants woke up in the middle of the night to urinate. Fesoterodine is an antimuscarinic which helps to control accidental urination by blocking the receptors in the bladder.

Killing Two Birds With One Stone

Since fesoterodine proved to be efficient in preventing incidences of incontinence, researchers wanted to take it a step further and determine if it had beneficial effects for sleeping. To produce accurate results, researchers had their participants take part in a sleep evaluation, first–the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index is a self-reported evaluation that measures sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, the amount of time it takes for an individual to fall asleep at night, as well as 4 other sleep factors. Each category is scaled from 0 to 3 and totaled together at the end. Typically, the higher the score, the poorer the sleep quality–ranging from a score of 5 or more. In their study, they found that 57% of their participants recorded poor sleeping habits with an average score of 6.4. However, the women who were taking fesoterodine each night reported that slept much more soundly; only waking up to urinate once per night, if at all.

Since incontinence affects 25% of women who are in their 20’s and 30’s, 50% of women who are menopausal, and 80% of women who are 80 and up, the newly discovered medicinal effects fesoterodine has on sleep patterns and incontinence is truly groundbreaking. Not only will this new course of treatment help to soothe incontinence in women while bettering their sleep patterns, it will greatly increase their overall quality of life.  

Incontinence-friendly Recipe of the Month: Green Smoothie

green-smoothie

After the holiday festivities, many are looking for a healthy reset after the cookies, pies and other sweet treats. Drinking a smoothie packed with fruits and veggies is one of the best ways to ensure your body is getting all essential vitamins. The great thing about smoothie recipes is their versatility, allowing you to mix and match ingredients to fit what you have on hand or your personal preferences. Just be sure to avoid dairy and citrus fruits, since those can exacerbate incontinence symptoms.

Here’s our suggestion for a delicious green smoothie to start the year off right:

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups spinach
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup mango
  • 1 cup pineapple
  • 2 bananas

Directions:

  1. Place the spinach in a blender.
  2. Add water.
  3. Blend together until smooth.
  4. Add mango, pineapple and banana.
  5. Blend until smooth.
  6. Pour into a cup of your choice.
  7. Enjoy!

That’s it! You can see the full recipe here, or check out other yummy combinations for smoothies to enjoy all year long here!

How to Stay Active Even in Chilly Temperatures

As winter temperatures dip below freezing across much of the United States, it can be hard to get outside for exercise. That’s why it’s important to continue moving your body with indoor workouts during the wintertime in order to stay active and healthy. Luckily, it is easy to participate in a full-body workout from the comfort of your own home if you know which routines work best for you. Check out these indoor workouts to stay energized and keep burning calories and building muscle during the colder months:

  1. Yoga

There are numerous health benefits of yoga, such as increasing flexibility and improving balance. You might also notice mental or emotional benefits to a yoga practice, such as reduced anxiety and increased mindfulness. Plus, there are great resources for watching free yoga videos on sites like YouTube, such as this or this.

  1. Indoor Walking

According to the American Council on Exercise (ACE), a regular walking program can help reduce blood cholesterol, lower blood pressure, increase cardiovascular endurance and boost bone strength. Home or gym treadmills are very popular options, but seniors can also research indoor tracks at local health organizations, community centers or schools. Many people prefer indoor tracks when compared to treadmills because they feel more natural and less intimidating, especially for beginning walkers.

  1. Indoor Cycling

It’s extremely important for seniors to avoid overexertion by choosing exercises that allow them to workout at their own paces. Even though indoor cycling can be very physically demanding, seniors can choose a pace that is appropriate for their unique bodies. Indoor cycling helps regular participants develop a strong cardiovascular system while building key muscle groups in the thighs, lower legs, back and upper body. The next time you try indoor cycling, remember that headphones and a good playlist are essential for “getting in the zone.”

  1. Indoor Swimming

Most people don’t have indoor swimming pools in their homes, but many local gyms offer indoor swimming opportunities yearlong. If you’re not a fan of swimming laps, consider signing up for a water aerobics class. Water aerobics classes are low impact, as the water’s buoyancy effect helps support body weight while exercising. In addition to being low impact, water aerobics is a great exercise for burning calories fast and building muscle in an amusing way.

Regardless of which favorite winter workout you choose, it’s most important to remember that exercise of any kind will help improve your physical and mental health. To keep things interesting, you can also combine different combinations of these exercises to work different muscle groups. Plus, you can feel comfortable exercising with our no leak undergarments for both men and women. Here’s to a healthier you in 2018!

The 5 Biggest Incontinence Triggers

urinary-incontinence

Urinary incontinence is the uncontrollable, sporadic leakage of urine due to a weakened urinary sphincter. Though this problem is widely known for to be a problem for the elderly, it’s actually an issue for millions of men and women across a spectrum of age groups. Unfortunately, living with urinary incontinence can be a daily battle that drastically affects one’s quality of life.

Avoiding the Biggest Incontinence Triggers

Let’s take a look at the 5 biggest incontinence triggers and how to avoid them.

1.Obesity

According to the NHS (National Health Service), obesity is a huge trigger in stress incontinence. The excess weight that is carried around by those who are obese has the ability to place a lot of pressure on one’s already weakened bladder. With extra pressure, the weakened bladder is more inclined to release urine in order to relieve the stress that’s being placed on it.

Losing weight, regimenting your diet, and taking part in daily exercise can do wonders in relieving stress incontinence due to obesity.

2.Alcohol

In many cases, consuming alcohol can be a major contributor to urge incontinence. Alcohol has the ability to stimulate the detrusor muscles–the group of muscles found in the wall of the bladder–to contract too often, leading to leakages.

Drinking less alcohol can help to alleviate the symptoms of urge incontinence.

3.Lack of Fluids

 Not drinking enough fluids on a regular basis–though it sounds counterintuitive–can be a major factor in incontinence. Without fluids like water to flush out the urine in your system, a build of very strong, concentrated urine can occur, irritating one’s bladder significantly.

4.Medications

If you read the label on some medications, you will notice that sometimes, some of the symptoms result in overactivity of the bladder. Many medications have the ability to disorder the regular process of passing and storing urine in one’s body; it even has the ability to increase urine production. Some medications that cause these symptoms include ACE inhibitors, antidepressants, sedatives, hormone replacement therapy meds, and diuretics.

If you suffer from incontinence and use the medications listed above, talk to your doctor to see what your best course of action would be.

5.Constipation

This is another popular trigger for urge incontinence due to its ability to cause a blockage in the bladder. To help ease the symptoms of constipation without using a diuretic, be sure to eat plenty of fiber, drink plenty of fluids, and keep active.

If you are noticing signs of incontinence that are unrelated to the above factors, be sure to contact your doctor for more information and for a more specific treatment plan.

At Wearever, we strive to make life easier for those that suffer with incontinence. Our incontinence panties, incontinence briefs, and reusable bed pads are quality products that you can rely on for sturdy protection.

Kegel Exercises Just Got A Lot More Fun

kegel-exercises

Kegels are an exercise that most women participate in order to manage their incontinence and strengthen their bladders. It’s a common misconception that Kegels are only done by women who have recently given birth as a way to strengthen their vaginal walls; however, this exercise is actually very commonly used to ease the symptoms of stress and urge incontinence.

Just recently, a new program has hit the shelves that are turning Kegels into a less boring and more fun exercise to take part in.

A Fun New Way to Complete Your Kegels

For those who are unfamiliar with Kegels or lead a very busy life, it can be hard to keep up with the exercise and remember the reps and counts you are supposed to do each day. Even for those who are very dedicated to building up their bladder strength by using a vaginal weight have trouble keeping up with the demands of the exercise–not to mention these small and sometimes expensive weights have a tendency to get misplaced far too often.

Now, a new Kegel exercise companion is on the market that is changing the way women are doing Kegels while promoting an altogether stronger vaginal wall and bladder.

Introducing the Perifit

The Perifit is a brand new, pelvic floor trainer that has the ability to send a Bluetooth signal to its accompanying app on your phone. When turned on, the app allows you play a fun video game that assists you in your Kegel exercises. And for those who are not tech savvy, don’t fret, because this trainer and app are very simple to use. The device itself is moderately sized and inconspicuous; lightweight and only 4 inches in length. It also comes with a small travel case and a guide to help new users get the hang of it. Once you have downloaded the app onto your phone, you will be able to choose the type of program that best fits your needs–i.e post-pregnancy, intimate well-being, and incontinence. From there, it will put together a 5-day treatment regimen based on your preferences.

The awesome part about this device is that the app is wired to your trainer. So, the games you are playing while using the device, are actually simulating it to move within you vaginal wall; helping you navigate the Kegel exercises. With each game you play, the tokens you collect, and levels you master, the device with expanding and contract, teaching you the ways of performing proper Kegels and therefore promoting ultimate bladder strength. Due to its small size and inconspicuous shape, this device is fairly simple to use when you are on the go. Many women even claim to use it while they are out and about and even wearing a skirt–however, we recommend that you only do this once you’ve mastered the Kegel technique.

 

Dealing With Incontinence and Depression

incontinence-and-depression

Depression is quite a common disease that affects the minds of many people around the world, and it surely isn’t selective when it comes to age.

Though incontinence is a medical condition that affects the function of one’s bladder, it’s no secret that the effects it has–mentally–on patients can be very similar to ways in which depression does.

Additionally, incontinence impacts both men and women of all ages. Just battling one of these diseases is challenging enough, but unfortunately, this combination is not uncommon. More are more scientists are noticing that there is a strong link between clinical depression and bladder problems such as incontinence.

Treating your Depression and Incontinence Together

Dealing with both depression and incontinence at the same time can be extraordinarily taxing on one’s physical and mental health. That’s why is it so important to have a full understanding of both of these conditions (talking to a professional) in order to live your best life. Unfortunately, many of those who suffer from incontinence are too embarrassed to admit they are dealing with such a problem. Due to that discomfort, their condition goes untreated and undetected by doctors. Those who suffer from incontinence and don’t receive the treatment they need will find many different ways to hide their problem from their friends and family. As time goes on, they become more and more reclusive, disconnected, and disengaged. This, unfortunately, is where depression and anxiety rear their ugly heads.

When depression and anxiety set it from the awful side effects of incontinence, it’s easier for those who suffer from it to allow it control their lives; it’s an ugly disease that knows no limits or boundaries. It’s understandable that getting help from a doctor is easier said than done, but for the sake of your mental and physical health, it is extremely important; depression and incontinence can be managed. The first place to start would be with a urologist. Once you have seen them and they have given you a treatment plan for your incontinence, then make it a point to schedule a visit with a psychiatrist regarding your depression. Fortunately, many patients have found that once they were able to get their incontinence in control, their episodes of depression began to diminish.

In the meantime, here are some helpful tips on ways to treat both your incontinence and your depression simultaneously:

    • Improve your diet:  What you put into your body has a direct effect on both your mind and bladder. We know it sounds crazy, but trust us, it’s true. The first thing you should cut out of your diet are things like caffeine, alcohol, and sweeteners (drinks that have a negative impact on your bladder). Always remember to drink plenty of water and eat foods that contain fiber.
  • Lose weight: Obesity is a major factor in the development of stress incontinence. By losing weight, your path to an incontinence-free life can be easily achieved. Start off by walking as much as possible–taking the stairs instead of an elevator or escalator. You should take part in 30 minutes of cardio per day.
  • Take part in pelvic floor exercises: Pelvic floor exercises are the easiest way to build strength in your bladder muscles. Stronger bladder muscles will result in fewer incontinence leakages.
  • Use incontinence products: There is absolutely nothing wrong with wearing incontinence products as a backup while on your road to recovery. Sometimes, it’s nice to have some peace of mind while going through a major lifestyle change.
  • Talk to your doctor regularly: We cannot stress enough the importance of talking to a doctor on a regular basis. Your doctor is the best person to speak with regarding any advice you may need or questions you have about your incontinence and even your depression.
  • Practice bladder training: This is an exercise that you can do from the comfort of your own home. When you have the urge to go to the bathroom, try to hold your bladder for a few seconds longer than you normally would. As time goes on, try to increase the amount of time you hold your bladder, little by little. For extra protection, always wear incontinence underwear.
  • Manage stress: Stress plays a major role in the development of depression and it can also have a negative effect on your incontinence. Try to take time throughout the day to do the things you enjoy the most. Even deep breathing exercises can help!

If you find that these tips are not assisting you in the ways you need them to, talk to your doctor about a treatment plan that will work best for your specific needs. Remember incontinence is treatable, Depression is treatable and you should never be ashamed of having it.

Many Young Female Athletes Experience Incontinence

female-athlete

Many believe that incontinence is something that only elderly men and women deal with but in fact, incontinence affects people of all ages. In many cases, there are women who have given birth before who have incontinence, and even athletes–who don’t have children–suffer from it, too. It’s quite remarkable how diverse of a population incontinence affects.

Incontinence Among Female Athletes

In a recent study published in PubMed.gov, doctors found that more than one-quarter of collegiate female athletes–who do not have children–experience a form of incontinence while taking part in physical activity. Specifically, basketball players and gymnasts have shown to suffer the most from this ailment with 67% and 66%. Least affected were women who played softball, golf, volleyball, and swim.

In a different study, researchers found that 35% of female Olympic track and field athletes experienced leakage episodes during their competitions. Additionally, another study confirmed that out of 372 female Portuguese athletes, 30% showed signs of urinary incontinence.

Treating Athletes With Incontinence Is Different

The treatment for incontinence within athletes is not the same, and that’s where many are having issues. Many physicians will assign a treatment plan that is tailored towards  women who suffer from incontinence postpartum and this is a huge mistake.

The main cause of incontinence in new mothers is due to a weakened pelvic floor and the best way to build up that strength in through the continued practice of kegels. However, kegels are NOT recommended to be performed by athletes. Isa Herrera, a physical therapist and strength conditioning coach states, “For them, kegels can be the worst thing to do since it puts more pressure on an already disproportionately strained system” (Source).

The real problem comes down to their workout routine; in many athletes, the focus of their workout is to build a strong core (rock solid abs), but when this happens, many tend to neglect the internal muscle groups that surround it. Herrera claims that she sees this type of problem in athletes who tend to participate in a substantial amount of core and glute workouts, cycling, and P90X. Luckily, there are other forms of treatment that can be issued to female athletes who suffer from incontinence that does not involve the performance of kegels.

Tips For Female Athletes With Incontinence

If you are a female athlete that suffers from episodes of incontinence but are unsure of your next steps, here are a few tips to follow:

    1. Talk to someone: If you suffer from incontinence, there is absolutely nothing to be ashamed about; you are not alone. The most important thing at this point is to not brush it off as something insignificant. The longer you put it off, the worse it can potentially get. Speak up to a coach or a doctor and they can lead you to your next step.
  • You won’t have to cease exercise: A major concern in women with incontinence is that if they admit to this problem, they may have to discontinue their daily workouts until they are healed. That is a very common misconception and a mistake that many women make. You will not have to stop working out, but you may have to tweak your routine a bit. Doctors and physician recommend exercises that will help to stabilize the pelvic region. For example, using a vaginal weight while running or taking part in yoga.
  • Find the right doctor for you: For athletes, it’s paramount to find a doctor that specializes in the pelvic floor region as well as sports medicine for the best treatment results. You’ll find that many physicians will recommend that you practice a form of exercise called ‘lean and breath’. Basically, practicing leaning forward while running; this will improve the range of motion in your legs while relaxing the abdomen. At the same time, practice inhaling and expanding with your stomach instead of sucking it in. This will reduce any downward pressure that is being placed on your pelvic region

By using these tips to your advantage and talking to the right doctor, you will be able to manage and treat your incontinence while participating in your athletic activities.  

At Wearever Incontinence, we provide incontinence briefs, incontinence panties, and reusable bed pads that you can depend on for protection.

Incontinence-Friendly Recipe of the Month: Roasted Vegetable and Quinoa Harvest Bowls

Looking for a simple healthy weeknight meal that still packs in the flavor? No need to slave over the stove for hours to create a delicious dish. This bowl is also perfect for lunches on the go or a picnic with your family. Particularly for those with incontinence, there are many identified ingredients that can make symptoms worse and this recipe avoids those known irritants and delivers delicious, fall flavor!

roasted-vegetables-and-quinoa

Ingredients:

  • 4 whole carrots, peeled and quartered (large pieces halved)
  • 1 1/2 cups quartered baby yellow potatoes
  • 2 cups halved Brussels sprouts
  • 2 Tbsp. maple syrup, divided
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil, divided
  • Healthy pinch each sea salt + black pepper
  • 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh rosemary (or dried)

Quinoa:

  • 1 cup white quinoa, well rinsed + drained
  • 1 3/4 cups water
  • Pinch sea salt

Sauce:

  • 1/2 cup tahini
  • 1 lemon, juiced (~3 Tbsp.)
  • 2-3 Tbsp. maple syrup

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. Place the carrots and potatoes on the sheet.
  4. Drizzle with 1 Tbsp. maple syrup, 1 Tbsp. olive oil, salt, pepper, and rosemary. Toss to combine.
  5. Bake for 12 minutes.
  6. While the vegetables are baking, heat a saucepan over medium-high heat.
  7. Once hot, add rinsed quinoa and lightly sautée before adding water to evaporate leftover moisture and bring out a nutty flavor.
  8. Cook for 2-3 minutes, stirring frequently. Then add water and a pinch of salt.
  9. Bring to a low boil over medium-high heat.
  10. Then reduce heat to a simmer and cover. Cook for 18-22 minutes or until liquid is absorbed and quinoa is fluffy.
  11. Open lid and fluff the quinoa with a fork. Tilt the lid, remove from the heat, and set aside.
  12. When the veggies are at the 12-minute mark, remove pan from the oven and add the Brussels sprouts.
  13. Top with remaining 1 Tbsp. oil, 1 Tbsp. maple syrup, and another pinch each of salt and pepper. Loosely toss to combine.
  14. Return pan to oven and roast for an additional 10-12 minutes or until Brussels sprouts are golden brown and the carrots and potatoes are fork tender. (This ensures that the potatoes and carrots are cooked through and the sprouts don’t get too soft.)
  15. Lastly, prepare dressing by adding tahini, lemon juice, and maple syrup to a small mixing bowl and whisking to combine. Add 2 Tbsp. of warm water at a time and whisk until thick but pourable. Taste and adjust flavor as needed.
  16. To serve, divide quinoa and vegetables between serving bowls and top with a generous drizzle of tahini sauce. Top with garnish of choice, such as pomegranate arils or fresh herbs.

Enjoy this healthy and satisfying bowl any day of the week! Prepare as your main dish or bring to a dinner party as a side. This comforting mix of veggies and quinoa is perfect for the chilly fall air. Recipe adapted from Minimalist Baker.

Is The O-Shot Effective Against Incontinence?

Urinary incontinence transpires when a person’s urinary sphincter grows weak and in turn, leads to involuntary, and unexpected leakage of urine on a daily basis. This is a problem that affects many people but occurs most frequently in women of all ages. Though incontinence is highly prevalent in the elderly, it can also affect women who have experienced pregnancy, menopause, and other related medical conditions.

According to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 25% of premenopausal women, 50% of middle-aged women or postmenopausal women, and 75% of elderly women suffer from incontinence. With such a high percentage of women suffering from incontinence, researchers have estimated that nearly $19.5 billion has been spent on a plethora of treatments, including surgery, in the effort to reduce the symptoms.

Just recently, a new treatment for stress incontinence was discovered and doctors are calling it the O-Shot. This new treatment has peaked the interest in many women who are plagued by incontinence and are in search for any means necessary to end their involuntary leaks.  

How the O-Shot Works

incontinence-o-shot

The O-Shot is an injection that is made from platelet-rich plasma that is directly taken from the patient’s blood and spun together. Due to its properties and yellow hue, doctors are calling the plasma, ‘liquid gold’. A doctor starts by drawing blood from the patient’s arm and place it in a centrifuge. After time, the centrifuge separates the red blood cells from the plasma.

Dr. Beverly Mikes explains that the plasma produced is rich with growth factors that promote cells to increase their production of elastin–a protein found in the dermis of the skin–collagen, and vasculature and nerves (Source). The plasma then helps to regenerate and stimulate new tissue which in turn, treats stress incontinence.

Once this process is completed, the doctor administers a topical numbing cream followed by an injection of a local anesthetic and injects four cc’s of the liquid gold into the vaginal wall and the remaining 1 cc into the clitoris. Women who have received this treatment must keep in mind that results are not immediate and any signs of noticeable improvement may take a while.

A data bank maintained by the O-Shot’s founder Dr. Charles Runels has shown that there is a 65% success rate within three months of the injection. If there are still no signs of improvement within the three months, doctors recommend that the patient receive a second shot. The data bank notes an 85% success rate for those who were administered a second shot.

For women who have experienced reduced incontinence symptoms in the O-Shot treatment, it is recommended to receive yearly injections. Currently, a single treatment of the O-Shot is priced at $1,500 and is not covered by insurance. 

 

Not Enough Research

Like any experimental branch of medicine that has been newly discovered, questions and controversy have followed the development of the O-Shot.

As eager as many women are to try out this new treatment, the lack of peer-reviewed scientific evidence is leaving many questioning its effectiveness and its level of risk. Unfortunately, due to the insufficient scientific data, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have yet to include the O-Shot treatment in its Practice Bulletin for Urinary Incontinence in Women. Obstetricians and Gynecologists are advising their patients to heed caution to the O-Shot due to the placebo effect. Many women who suffer from urinary incontinence are very embarrassed to admit that they have this problem–even though it is more common than most believe it to be. Because of this, there is a heightened chance of the placebo effect occurring. Sometimes, all it takes is one woman’s positive testimony of the procedure to convince the rest that the treatment will work just as well for them. Hopefully, as time passes and more research is conducted, obstetricians and gynecologists can officially deem the O-Shot as an effective treatment for urinary incontinence.

There Are Many Ways To Manage Incontinence

Until more research is done, doctors recommend that patients practice pelvic muscle training to make your bladder and pelvic muscles strong enough to stop an unexpected leakage. Surgery, medication, and behavior therapy are recommended to those with extreme and debilitating cases of incontinence.

For extra protection from incontinence, we at Wearever have the all the supplies you need. Our incontinence underwear for men and incontinence panties are discrete, durable, fashionable, economically priced, and can go right in the wash after each use. For overnight protection, Wearever has a selection of washable bed pads to choose from that are long-lasting and will keep your bed dry. Wearever has you covered from those unexpected leaks.  

Fecal Incontinence Is More Common Than You Think

fecal-incontinence

When we think of incontinence, we often associate it with unwanted and unintentional urine leakage.

However, fecal incontinence is almost as prevalent as urinary incontinence yet is rarely discussed. Incontinence can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender and could be due to hereditary factors or other health-induced reasons.

The Prevalence of Fecal Incontinence

Did you know that 24 percent of men and 17 percent of women experience fecal incontinence?

That means that almost one in five adults have, at one point or another, experienced fecal incontinence (Source).

Fecal incontinence could be accompanied by other bowel issues such as: constipation, gas and bloating, and diarrhea.

Factors That Cause Fecal Incontinence

Damage to the anal sphincter muscles

Sphincter muscles work to hold stool within the body. When these muscles are damaged, they become weak and fail to hold stool in resulting in fecal incontinence. A common cause of this is an injury sustained during childbirth. With the intense pressure that this area endures, damage to the anal sphincter muscles is common.

Pelvic nerve damage

When pelvic muscles are damaged, it can severely affect your ability to sense when you have to use the bathroom.

Reduction in rectum elasticity

There are various things that can lessen the resilience of the flexibility of the bowel. This could be hereditary or as a result of surgery or childbirth.

Dementia

Fecal incontinence tends to be prevalent in those suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s due to the inability to control bowl movements.

Fecal incontinence is also referred to as Accidental Bowl Loss (ABL) and is too infrequently discussed with doctors and physicians.

If you suffer from fecal incontinence, it is absolutely nothing to be ashamed about. Treatments are available that will supply you with relief of your symptoms so that you can lead a normal everyday life. Speak to your doctor or physician today and start a journey toward a better quality of life that is free from the worries of incontinence.

Wearever provides a a variety of products that help you manage incontinence. Check out our incontinence panties, incontinence briefs, and reusable bed pads.