The Most Comfy and Fashionable Leak Protection Ever – Customer Review

lace trim incontinence panties

What if there was a way to save money, protect the environment and still be protected from uncomfortable leaks? Kristyn Smith from Kristy Product Review reviewed our Lace Trim & Cotton Panties, and shares how our products do just that! Here are a few thoughts from her blog:

“These panties are by far the most comfy and fashionable type of leak protection I have ever encountered. They come in many assortments of sizes, color, and styles. They are also available in both male and female panties and briefs. These undergarments are washable, so they save you money on disposables as they are resistant between 200 – 250 washes. These undergarments feature varying levels of protection and protect against light, moderate, and heavy leakage.”

Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts, Kristyn! You can see the unboxing of her Wearever panties on her YouTube channel at the follow link https://youtu.be/ZMEHtBXwdyI or read her full blog post, click here.

 

7 Tips On Staying Safe When Trick-or-Treating With Your Grandkids

trick or treating

Halloween can be a fun night for the whole family dressing up and interacting with your neighbors and community! But with so many people out and about Oct. 31, it’s important to properly prepare your family to stay safe and have an enjoyable evening.

Here are seven helpful safety tips to keep your kids and grandkids protected.

  1. Select comfortable costumes

A child’s costume should be short to avoid tripping. Have them wear comfortable and well fitting footwear to avoid falling or discomfort while out and about. Avoid masks and other pieces that cover their face and mouth, as they can make it hard to see or breathe.

Also, double check that all costumes are flame retardant because some homes use open flames as decoration.

  1. Go early

There’s no need to wait until it’s completely dark to head outside. In fact, a good time to start, especially with little ones, is after an early dinner at dusk. Plus, if you are the first ones there, you will have your pick of candy!

  1. Watch out for cars & pedestrians

Halloween can mean especially large volumes of pedestrian traffic, so wear brighter or reflective colors to make yourself noticeable to cars. Remind children to look both ways before crossing the streets and hold the hands of little ones. Also, if you are driving, remember to be on high alert of pedestrians.

  1. Candy safety

You never know what children can receive in their Halloween baskets, so it is important to inspect their candy stash before they dig in. If you anticipate needing a treat during your evening out, consider packing a snack or two until you get home.

  1. Plan your route in advance

Make a plan to only visit houses of people you know and trust in the neighborhood. Make it fun for your grandkids by making a list or treasure map and cross of the houses you’ve visited.

  1. Stranger danger

Remind the little ones to never go with someone they don’t know or get into an unfamiliar car. If someone invites them inside to receive their candy, tell them they must always stay outside the front door for their safety.

  1. Alternatives

If you aren’t comfortable with trick or treating, there are always alternatives! Stay home and have a party with games and spooky movies, or consider hosting a neighborhood trunk or treat from your driveway or street. For older kids, have them pass out the treats to the visitors and enjoy the parade of costumes.

Kids wait all year to dress up, go door-to-door asking for treats and getting into characters to fit with their costumes. By following these safety tips, you can ensure they will not only have a fun and festive Halloween, but a safe one too!

Dealing With Incontinence and Depression

incontinence-and-depression

Depression is quite a common disease that affects the minds of many people around the world, and it surely isn’t selective when it comes to age.

Though incontinence is a medical condition that affects the function of one’s bladder, it’s no secret that the effects it has–mentally–on patients can be very similar to ways in which depression does.

Additionally, incontinence impacts both men and women of all ages. Just battling one of these diseases is challenging enough, but unfortunately, this combination is not uncommon. More are more scientists are noticing that there is a strong link between clinical depression and bladder problems such as incontinence.

Treating your Depression and Incontinence Together

Dealing with both depression and incontinence at the same time can be extraordinarily taxing on one’s physical and mental health. That’s why is it so important to have a full understanding of both of these conditions (talking to a professional) in order to live your best life. Unfortunately, many of those who suffer from incontinence are too embarrassed to admit they are dealing with such a problem. Due to that discomfort, their condition goes untreated and undetected by doctors. Those who suffer from incontinence and don’t receive the treatment they need will find many different ways to hide their problem from their friends and family. As time goes on, they become more and more reclusive, disconnected, and disengaged. This, unfortunately, is where depression and anxiety rear their ugly heads.

When depression and anxiety set it from the awful side effects of incontinence, it’s easier for those who suffer from it to allow it control their lives; it’s an ugly disease that knows no limits or boundaries. It’s understandable that getting help from a doctor is easier said than done, but for the sake of your mental and physical health, it is extremely important; depression and incontinence can be managed. The first place to start would be with a urologist. Once you have seen them and they have given you a treatment plan for your incontinence, then make it a point to schedule a visit with a psychiatrist regarding your depression. Fortunately, many patients have found that once they were able to get their incontinence in control, their episodes of depression began to diminish.

In the meantime, here are some helpful tips on ways to treat both your incontinence and your depression simultaneously:

    • Improve your diet:  What you put into your body has a direct effect on both your mind and bladder. We know it sounds crazy, but trust us, it’s true. The first thing you should cut out of your diet are things like caffeine, alcohol, and sweeteners (drinks that have a negative impact on your bladder). Always remember to drink plenty of water and eat foods that contain fiber.
  • Lose weight: Obesity is a major factor in the development of stress incontinence. By losing weight, your path to an incontinence-free life can be easily achieved. Start off by walking as much as possible–taking the stairs instead of an elevator or escalator. You should take part in 30 minutes of cardio per day.
  • Take part in pelvic floor exercises: Pelvic floor exercises are the easiest way to build strength in your bladder muscles. Stronger bladder muscles will result in fewer incontinence leakages.
  • Use incontinence products: There is absolutely nothing wrong with wearing incontinence products as a backup while on your road to recovery. Sometimes, it’s nice to have some peace of mind while going through a major lifestyle change.
  • Talk to your doctor regularly: We cannot stress enough the importance of talking to a doctor on a regular basis. Your doctor is the best person to speak with regarding any advice you may need or questions you have about your incontinence and even your depression.
  • Practice bladder training: This is an exercise that you can do from the comfort of your own home. When you have the urge to go to the bathroom, try to hold your bladder for a few seconds longer than you normally would. As time goes on, try to increase the amount of time you hold your bladder, little by little. For extra protection, always wear incontinence underwear.
  • Manage stress: Stress plays a major role in the development of depression and it can also have a negative effect on your incontinence. Try to take time throughout the day to do the things you enjoy the most. Even deep breathing exercises can help!

If you find that these tips are not assisting you in the ways you need them to, talk to your doctor about a treatment plan that will work best for your specific needs. Remember incontinence is treatable, Depression is treatable and you should never be ashamed of having it.

Many Young Female Athletes Experience Incontinence

female-athlete

Many believe that incontinence is something that only elderly men and women deal with but in fact, incontinence affects people of all ages. In many cases, there are women who have given birth before who have incontinence, and even athletes–who don’t have children–suffer from it, too. It’s quite remarkable how diverse of a population incontinence affects.

Incontinence Among Female Athletes

In a recent study published in PubMed.gov, doctors found that more than one-quarter of collegiate female athletes–who do not have children–experience a form of incontinence while taking part in physical activity. Specifically, basketball players and gymnasts have shown to suffer the most from this ailment with 67% and 66%. Least affected were women who played softball, golf, volleyball, and swim.

In a different study, researchers found that 35% of female Olympic track and field athletes experienced leakage episodes during their competitions. Additionally, another study confirmed that out of 372 female Portuguese athletes, 30% showed signs of urinary incontinence.

Treating Athletes With Incontinence Is Different

The treatment for incontinence within athletes is not the same, and that’s where many are having issues. Many physicians will assign a treatment plan that is tailored towards  women who suffer from incontinence postpartum and this is a huge mistake.

The main cause of incontinence in new mothers is due to a weakened pelvic floor and the best way to build up that strength in through the continued practice of kegels. However, kegels are NOT recommended to be performed by athletes. Isa Herrera, a physical therapist and strength conditioning coach states, “For them, kegels can be the worst thing to do since it puts more pressure on an already disproportionately strained system” (Source).

The real problem comes down to their workout routine; in many athletes, the focus of their workout is to build a strong core (rock solid abs), but when this happens, many tend to neglect the internal muscle groups that surround it. Herrera claims that she sees this type of problem in athletes who tend to participate in a substantial amount of core and glute workouts, cycling, and P90X. Luckily, there are other forms of treatment that can be issued to female athletes who suffer from incontinence that does not involve the performance of kegels.

Tips For Female Athletes With Incontinence

If you are a female athlete that suffers from episodes of incontinence but are unsure of your next steps, here are a few tips to follow:

    1. Talk to someone: If you suffer from incontinence, there is absolutely nothing to be ashamed about; you are not alone. The most important thing at this point is to not brush it off as something insignificant. The longer you put it off, the worse it can potentially get. Speak up to a coach or a doctor and they can lead you to your next step.
  • You won’t have to cease exercise: A major concern in women with incontinence is that if they admit to this problem, they may have to discontinue their daily workouts until they are healed. That is a very common misconception and a mistake that many women make. You will not have to stop working out, but you may have to tweak your routine a bit. Doctors and physician recommend exercises that will help to stabilize the pelvic region. For example, using a vaginal weight while running or taking part in yoga.
  • Find the right doctor for you: For athletes, it’s paramount to find a doctor that specializes in the pelvic floor region as well as sports medicine for the best treatment results. You’ll find that many physicians will recommend that you practice a form of exercise called ‘lean and breath’. Basically, practicing leaning forward while running; this will improve the range of motion in your legs while relaxing the abdomen. At the same time, practice inhaling and expanding with your stomach instead of sucking it in. This will reduce any downward pressure that is being placed on your pelvic region

By using these tips to your advantage and talking to the right doctor, you will be able to manage and treat your incontinence while participating in your athletic activities.  

At Wearever Incontinence, we provide incontinence briefs, incontinence panties, and reusable bed pads that you can depend on for protection.

Incontinence-Friendly Recipe of the Month: Roasted Vegetable and Quinoa Harvest Bowls

Looking for a simple healthy weeknight meal that still packs in the flavor? No need to slave over the stove for hours to create a delicious dish. This bowl is also perfect for lunches on the go or a picnic with your family. Particularly for those with incontinence, there are many identified ingredients that can make symptoms worse and this recipe avoids those known irritants and delivers delicious, fall flavor!

roasted-vegetables-and-quinoa

Ingredients:

  • 4 whole carrots, peeled and quartered (large pieces halved)
  • 1 1/2 cups quartered baby yellow potatoes
  • 2 cups halved Brussels sprouts
  • 2 Tbsp. maple syrup, divided
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil, divided
  • Healthy pinch each sea salt + black pepper
  • 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh rosemary (or dried)

Quinoa:

  • 1 cup white quinoa, well rinsed + drained
  • 1 3/4 cups water
  • Pinch sea salt

Sauce:

  • 1/2 cup tahini
  • 1 lemon, juiced (~3 Tbsp.)
  • 2-3 Tbsp. maple syrup

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. Place the carrots and potatoes on the sheet.
  4. Drizzle with 1 Tbsp. maple syrup, 1 Tbsp. olive oil, salt, pepper, and rosemary. Toss to combine.
  5. Bake for 12 minutes.
  6. While the vegetables are baking, heat a saucepan over medium-high heat.
  7. Once hot, add rinsed quinoa and lightly sautée before adding water to evaporate leftover moisture and bring out a nutty flavor.
  8. Cook for 2-3 minutes, stirring frequently. Then add water and a pinch of salt.
  9. Bring to a low boil over medium-high heat.
  10. Then reduce heat to a simmer and cover. Cook for 18-22 minutes or until liquid is absorbed and quinoa is fluffy.
  11. Open lid and fluff the quinoa with a fork. Tilt the lid, remove from the heat, and set aside.
  12. When the veggies are at the 12-minute mark, remove pan from the oven and add the Brussels sprouts.
  13. Top with remaining 1 Tbsp. oil, 1 Tbsp. maple syrup, and another pinch each of salt and pepper. Loosely toss to combine.
  14. Return pan to oven and roast for an additional 10-12 minutes or until Brussels sprouts are golden brown and the carrots and potatoes are fork tender. (This ensures that the potatoes and carrots are cooked through and the sprouts don’t get too soft.)
  15. Lastly, prepare dressing by adding tahini, lemon juice, and maple syrup to a small mixing bowl and whisking to combine. Add 2 Tbsp. of warm water at a time and whisk until thick but pourable. Taste and adjust flavor as needed.
  16. To serve, divide quinoa and vegetables between serving bowls and top with a generous drizzle of tahini sauce. Top with garnish of choice, such as pomegranate arils or fresh herbs.

Enjoy this healthy and satisfying bowl any day of the week! Prepare as your main dish or bring to a dinner party as a side. This comforting mix of veggies and quinoa is perfect for the chilly fall air. Recipe adapted from Minimalist Baker.

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

prostate-cancer-awareness-month

Did you know that prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in the United States? According to the American Cancer Society, 161,360 men are diagnosed with the disease each year. The good news is approximately 90% of all cases are detected in the early, contained stages, so the cure rate is very high.

One of the reasons for such a high cure rate is the awareness of symptoms and detection of risk signs of this disease. September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, so we want to continue to share helpful knowledge and encourage readers and their loved ones to talk to their doctors should they have any concerns. Below are some symptoms of prostate cancer, so if you’re experiencing any of the following, please talk to your healthcare professional about your prostate health:

  • Loss of bladder or bowel control
  • Problems urinating, including a slow or weak urinary stream
  • The need to urinate more often, especially at night
  • Blood in urine or semen
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Pain in your hips, back (spine), chest (ribs), or other new pain
  • Weakness or numbness in your legs or feet

To learn more about these symptoms and your prostate health, visit the American Cancer Society’s website. For help managing urinary incontinence and other symptoms of prostate complications, check out some of these resources that can help keep you informed and comfortable.

 

Kegels Can Help Men With Incontinence Too

male-pelvis

The term ‘Kegels’ is commonly associated as an exercise that’s customarily designed for women. Kegels are the go-to exercise for women to perform in an effort to minimize episodes of incontinence in a safe, natural, and effective way. This exercise is especially popular in groups of women who have just given birth are in need of an easy method to strengthen their pelvic muscles.

However, studies have shown that not only are Kegels beneficial for women with incontinence, they have the ability to be very useful for men, as well. Yes, you read that right; Kegels can help men with incontinence! Men, if your pelvic muscles are growing weaker with age and your incontinence occurrences are becoming more frequent, it may be time to add Kegels to your daily routine.

Incontinence in Men

Incontinence in men is an issue that occurs more frequently than most would think. Many times, male incontinence starts with the weakening of the pelvic floor muscles which severely affects the overall support this is needed by the bladder and urethra. From there, any sudden movement such as running, jumping, sneezing, coughing, laughing, and even walking too fast, can incite urinary leakage; more commonly known as stress incontinence. If you find that you suffer from stress incontinence, do not fret; the treatment process may be a lot simpler than you think.

Kegels… For Men?

Studies have shown that participating in Kegel exercises on a daily basis can help to strengthen your pelvic muscles, and therefore, improve your stress incontinence.

Way back in 2005, the Journal of European Urology conducted a study with 300 post-prostatectomy incontinence patients in 2 groups of 150. The first group was assigned to perform Kegel exercises on a daily basis, while the other group as assigned nothing. In a matter of 6 months, 95% of the patients in the first group gained full control over their continence and did not experience any episodes of leakage. Not to mention, 19% of those same patients were able to eliminate their incontinence problem within the first month, alone. From this research, it’s fair to say that Kegel exercises truly have a positive effect on incontinence.

It’s true that Kegels may have a ‘womanly’ connotation but regardless of its stature, it’s proven to be a helpful method of naturally treating male incontinence through the strengthening of the pelvic muscles. Surprisingly enough, the pelvic floor muscles play an important role in the overall health of both men and women. It’s essential to have strong pelvic muscles in order to attain proper bladder function, bowel function, and peak sexual health. And the best way to keep our pelvic muscles in superb condition is through the consistent performance of Kegels.

Kegels Are Even Effective For Other Issues

If you do not suffer from male incontinence but other symptoms such as:

  • Frequent constipation
  • Uncontrollable bowels
  • Erectile disfunction 
  • Being overweight

Then your pelvic floor muscle may be suffering and in need of daily strengthening exercises, such as Kegels. However, if you find that your Kegel exercises are not improving any of the issues listed above, you may want to schedule an appointment with your doctor to discuss a treatment plan that would work best for your specific needs.

Wearever Is Here to Help

Building your pelvic strength through Kegels to prevent male incontinence is something that takes time, consistency, and patience.

Therefore, until a noticeable difference is observed, be sure to always have your Wearever incontinence briefs on in case of any incontinence leaks during your Kegel exercises. If you are not experiencing results immediately, do not panic; results will come in time as long as you are making a conscious and consistent effort to perform your Kegel exercises routinely.

Experience Socks So Comfortable You Feel Barefoot – Product Review

buster brown socks

Whether you have diabetes, sensitive skin, poor circulation or just spend a lot of time standing, the support we give to our feet is so important to continue to be mobile and without pain. Our breathable, seamless socks made by Buster Brown help keep you cool and comfortable for miles at a time.

Tara from Dividing by Zero recently reviewed our Buster Brown Cotton Diabetic Socks for Women. Tara’s mother has diabetes, so she knows firsthand how important it is to prevent constriction and feel supported.  She shared her thoughts on her blog:

“These socks are great for anyone with poor circulation or easily irritated skin. The socks have a seamless design and are made with no elastic or synthetics.  These socks are incredibly comfortable – the material is super soft, and they don’t bind up your feet at all. It almost feels like you’re not even wearing socks because of the combination of softness, gentleness, and their magical ability to stay put despite the lack of elastic.”

Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts, Tara! We always love hearing how our products provide comfort and convenience. To read Tara’s full blog post, click here.

Incontinence-friendly Recipe of the Month: Roasted Turkey Wraps

Roasted Turkey Apple Wraps

Looking for a lunch or dinner option you can whip up quickly after a day of summer activities with the family? These wraps are a perfect choice for all to enjoy, and the best part is they contain no irritants for those with incontinence!

Ingredients:

  • 4 whole wheat wraps
  • 4 tablespoons honey mustard, store bought or a mixture of equal parts honey and Dijon mustard
  • 1 pound roasted turkey, thinly sliced
  • 1 Granny Smith apple, halved, cored and thinly sliced
  • 1 bunch watercress, tough stems removed

Directions:

  1. Spread one tablespoon of the honey mustard on one side of each wrap
  2. Place about one-fourth of the turkey slices in the center of each wrap.
  3. Arrange the apple slices and then the watercress on top of the turkey, dividing them evenly.
  4. Gently fold the sides of the wrap and press over the filling, tucking the edges snugly like a burrito.
  5. Cut each sandwich in half diagonally and serve

This recipe is easy to make and won’t heat up the kitchen during these hot summer months! Take some along on a picnic or enjoy poolside! You can see the full recipe here.

 

 

 

Running for Enjoyment Rather than to the Restroom

It’s no secret that running is extremely beneficial to your health. In addition to helping you stay fit, running also boosts mental health, prevents diseases and relieves stress. But did you know that as many as 30 percent of female runners report experiencing urinary incontinence while running? If that’s you, there’s no need to cancel your afternoon jog. Instead, check out these five tips for how to enjoy the miles without the worry:

  1. Kill the Urge with Kegels

kegel-exercise

When you have weakened pelvic muscles, the impact of your legs hitting the ground can cause leakage. Pelvic floor muscles can be strengthened through Kegel exercises, which luckily can be done anytime and anywhere.

  1. Cut Out the Coffee

no-coffee

If you have incontinence, consuming caffeine before a run can actually increase the urge to urinate, not suppress it. Caffeine is a natural stimulant and diuretic. Instead, make sure you get a good night’s sleep and are hydrated to enjoy the miles without emergency stops.

  1. Think about Timing

timing

To prevent any mishaps, time your fluid intake and bathroom visits throughout the day and before pounding the pavement. It’s recommended you visit the restroom every two to three hours before leaving to keep you on track.

  1. Gear Up for your Goals

athletic-clothing

As runners, we think a lot about how to make our time exercising as successful as possible. Careful consideration is put into everything from our sneakers to our earphones. Wearing the right clothing can make a big difference in achieving your distance and time goals. Our comfortable and breathable incontinence panties and briefs allow you to keep your focus on reaching the finish line.

  1. Slow and Steady Wins the Race

As you work on strengthening your pelvic floor, you might want to consider taking things slow during a jog. When we move faster, we are more likely to have poor form and our body struggles to compensate. While you put effort into bolstering your muscles, consider decreasing your pace.

Incontinence shouldn’t stop you from enjoying exercise. Check out this blog post for more on how incontinence can affect physical activity and steps you can take to mitigate its impact.