The vSculpt May Help Women With Stress Incontinence

female-incontinenceAs we enter into the new year, doctors and medical researchers are discovering more and more ways to treat and relieve stress incontinence in both men and women. In their research, they noticed that stress incontinence and forms of sexual dysfunction are quite common in many women and even–on occasion–go hand in hand with one another. However, in the past few years, doctors have discovered a plethora of ways to treat both of these common afflictions, allowing women to find the reprieve they so desperately need and, ultimately, improving their overall quality of life.

A Common Occurrence In Women

Currently, 40% of women will experience some form of urinary incontinence at one point in their life, with the most common form being stress incontinence. Leaks from stress incontinence typically occur from coughing, sneezing, or from different forms of exercise or for many women, after childbirth.

As women age, urinary leakage tends to get worse, especially after menopause. To correct this troublesome issue, many doctors tend to recommend two different forms of treatment; conservative treatment such as lifestyle changes, weight loss, or medication, pelvic floor exercises or a more intense treatment course such as surgery.

Although pelvic floor exercises yield the highest results, it requires the training and monitoring of a physician or physical therapist to ensure that the patient is executing them properly. However, in light of the high demands of the NHS, many physiotherapists are overworked and boast long waiting lists and follow-up lists, which proves to be a problem for patients who desperately need help in controlling their urinary incontinence problems.

The vSculpt May Help

Due to the sheer number of women that deal with the issue, there have been recent  developments of medical devices that assist women with incontinence, with the latest device being the vSculpt.

The vSculpt is a device that’s inserted vaginally and uses multi-modal technology to improve the strength of a woman’s pelvic floor muscles. To do this, the vSculpt uses a combination of light therapy, heat, and therapeutic vibration. This combination works to restore both the tissue and the muscle of the pelvic floor and promotes better control over leaks and natural lubrication; both of which can help to improve not only urinary incontinence, but minor forms of sexual dysfunction as well.

To support this claim, the International Urogynecology Journal published a study that was conducted by doctors of Seattle, Washington. This study evaluated the patients who used the vSculpt for 45 days, 55 women total. At the end of the study, researchers examined the results by using a 1-hour pad weight test, pelvic floor muscle strength test, and a series of questionnaires that looked into the patient’s quality of life–with a concentration in stress incontinence and sexual function issues. Their studies yield significantly high results and showed that with this new device, women actually saw a vast improvement in both their urinary incontinence and sexual function problems, significantly improving their overall quality of life.

With these results, more and more doctors around the country are recommending the vSculpt as a minimally invasive treatment for urinary incontinence.

vSculpt is not available yet in the U.S, but you can learn more information about it here.