Tag Archives: urinary incontinence

Incontinence articles related specifically to urinary incontinence

Diseases that Lead to Urinary Incontinence Symptoms

Most people know that loss of bladder control leads to urinary incontinence or light to heavy leakage throughout the day and night. And, although it is very common in older men and women, urinary incontinence is not inevitable for seniors as they age. But what most people don’t know is that urinary incontinence can emerge as a symptom of certain diseases that affect our nerve endings, such as diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Here’s why each of these diseases can affect bladder control, resulting in leakage:

Diabetes and Incontinence

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Type 1 diabetes occurs when the human body does not make enough insulin, caused by the immune system attacking and destroying pancreatic cells that produce insulin. Urinary complications from Type 1 diabetes can arise because of the damage the disease causes to blood vessels and nerve-endings in our bodies. In most people, this nerve damage slows the communication between bladder muscles and the brain, which causes the bladder muscles to release before the brain knows it’s time to visit the restroom.

Alternatively, nerve damage from Type 1 diabetes can also weaken bladder muscles so that the bladder cannot completely empty during urination. In this case, the bladder muscles do usually have time to communicate with the brain but, after urination, those affected will notice light to heavy leakage after they feel as though they’ve completely emptied their bladders.

Like Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes can also lead to urinary incontinence symptoms. However, symptoms of urinary incontinence in individuals with Type 2 diabetes usually results from body weight pressing against the pelvic muscles, causing the bladder muscles to release. In general, both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes can cause frequent urination due to increased fluid intake, as diabetes can cause increased thirst as a result of excess glucose in the bloodstream. As you can imagine, drinking more liquids means increased, frequent stress on bladder muscles that are already weakened, often exacerbating the issue.

Multiple Sclerosis and Incontinence

ms and incontinence

Similar to diabetes, multiple sclerosis (MS) can also cause bladder control problems due to the delayed transmission of nerve signals between the bladder and the brain. Multiple sclerosis is a disease that causes the immune system to eat away at protective coverings on nerves, resulting in – among other symptoms – issues with nerve signals that usually tell the brain that the body needs to release urine. Like diabetes, damaged nerve-endings from MS can result in an overactive bladder that cannot hold the usual amount of urine, or it can also cause urinary retention, which is when the bladder muscles are too weak to properly empty, causing leakage after the body thinks it has fully emptied the bladder. Both of these conditions can cause a myriad of symptoms including urgent urination, delayed start of urination and nighttime urination.

The Solution: Wearever® Incontinence Products

Urinary incontinence can create major challenges in managing one’s work, home, and social life. Because of the constant fear of light to heavy leakage, people with urinary incontinence can feel a loss of self-esteem, self-confidence and general independence. However, if you have urinary incontinence, it’s important to remember that you are not alone and that there are resources and products out there that can dramatically improve your daily lifestyle and help you return to a sense of normalcy.

incontinence pantyAmong these resources are Wearever incontinence products for men and women. Wearever incontinence underwear, incontinence panties, and incontinence briefs are 100 percent washable for 200 – 250 loads, which saves individuals substantial time and money. In fact, washable undergarments typically save over $400 a year compared to buying disposable panties and briefs.

Among our most popular styles for women are our Midrise Maximum Panty and the Maximum Absorbency Bikini Cut Panty, depending on which style you prefer. Both are stylish, heavily absorbing solutions to leakage caused by urinary incontinence. Each style actually offers even more protection than our regular Women’s Super Incontinence Panty, while continuing our tradition of soft cotton and polyester fabric. Even better, the fabric is lined with antimicrobial protection that reduces odor-causing bacteria!

incontinence briefsComplete with the perfect combination of high-absorbency materials and style, our Maximum Absorbency Bikini Cut Panties are lab-tested and proven to absorb up to 20 fluid ounces of liquid, making them the most absorbent of our Wearever incontinence panties. These panties provide all-day double protection against light to heavy leakage.

For men, one of our most popular styles is our Maximum Absorbency H-Fly Boxer Brief. Holding up to 20 ounces of liquid, it is our highest absorbency boxer brief and is ideal for men dealing with moderate to heavy incontinence. The sewn-in Unique-Dri pad traps both excess liquids and unwanted odors, while the horizontal fly design makes accessibility and breathability easier than ever before. Toss out those pads and disposable undergarments and replace them with this stylish, effective and reusable Wearever option, good for up to 250 washes!

In addition to these styles, we have over a dozen more styles to choose from in Women’s and Men’s!

Obesity Increases Risk For Incontinence In Young Women

urinary incontinence

A recent study has revealed that obesity is linked to urinary incontinence in young women. Obesity has the ability to double the risk of urinary incontinence in young to middle-aged women; however, research suggests that young women can reduce this risk by maintaining a healthy weight, eating healthy, and exercising daily.

Obesity and Incontinence

When compared with women of average weight, researchers from the University of Queensland found that obese women ran twice the risk of developing urinary incontinence. It’s believed that the excess weight surrounding the abdomen places pressure on the bladder, leading to incidents of incontinence. In their study, the University of Queensland examined approximately 14 other studies that involved 47,293 women across eight different countries that expressed concerns with incontinence. In their findings, they discovered that nearly 35% of women who were overweight were more likely to have urinary incontinence. However, no differences were found between women younger than 36 and those 36-55 years of age. This finding is quite significant since countless studies that were previously carried out found an increased risk of urinary incontinence amongst older women. Now, it seems that younger women may have this risk. In light of this discovery, the researchers at the University of Queensland stated, “This result point to the importance of excess weight, above and beyond age-related risk” (source).

Additionally, there were a few limitations with the findings. For example, only five of the studies they examined accounted for the women who had given birth. They also did not specify the different categories of obesity. Tayla Lamerton, a PhD candidate in women’s health at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, explains, “We know that urinary incontinence can be a complex issue, especially among younger women…understanding overweight and obesity as a determinant of urinary incontinence could play a role in the way we counsel those affected by the condition, and our findings provide a building block to further explore lifestyle interventions for preventing and managing incontinence.”

For now, researchers recommend that obese women take the proper measures to live a healthier lifestyle. A reduction in weight could very well alleviate the pressure placed on the bladder and pelvic floor muscles, and therefore, reduce the symptoms of incontinence.

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How Often Should You Get Screened For Incontinence?

urinary incontinence

The Women’s Preventive Services Initiative released new and updated guidelines for annual urinary incontinence screening for women. Since urinary incontinence can affect women of all ages, it’s essential for them to take part in yearly screenings to ensure peak urinary health. How annual gynecological appointments are highly important for women to take part in, the same concept is being applied to these urinary screenings. With these annual screenings, specialists will be able to note any warning signs of the development of urinary incontinence, as well as help manage it properly.

Urinary Screenings

Currently, urinary incontinence affects approximately 51% of women. While urinary incontinence impacts one’s ability to control their bladder, it also hinders them in other ways. Urinary incontinence can greatly harm one physically, functionally, and even socially. Unfortunately, plenty of negative stigma surrounds this affliction, leaving women and even men embarrassed to discuss their problem with friends, family, and professionals. Across the globe, many women are disinclined to talk to their health care providers about their urinary incontinence, leaving their problem untreated and overlooked. Without treatment, the symptoms of urinary incontinence can grow increasingly worse.

According to the South African Urogynaecology Association, there is a severe lack of studies that regard the widespread presence of urinary incontinence in South African women. It’s easy to assume that the lack of these studies are directly correlated with the fact that many women are hesitant to admit their problem. On their website, the South African Urogynaecology Association explains, “It has been suggested that the prevalence of incontinence and urinary dysfunction globally is lower in Black and Asian women than in White women. However, in the Western Cape the prevalence of daily UI in Black women was 17.2%, in Cape Coloured women 12.8%, and in White women 13.2%” (source).

The New Guidelines for Urinary Screening

The Women’s Preventive Services Initiative came together and created a new set of guidelines that promote annual screening for urinary incontinence. These screenings will help determine if a woman has urinary incontinence and examine how it affects her daily life. Currently, the guidelines to the new screening requirements are published in the journal, Annals of Internal Medicine.

With proactive treatment for urinary incontinence, doctors can help women manage their symptoms and lead an improved quality of life.

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Celebrities Discuss Their Lives with Incontinence

From television stars to supermodels, many celebrities are using their public visibility to discuss living with urinary incontinence and encourage open, healthy conversation about the topic. These celebrities are speaking out in solidarity to reinforce that leakage does not discriminate based on age, profession or fame. Rather, millions of people across the United States are living with urinary incontinence for a variety of reasons, including pregnancy, child birth, health conditions, diet, stress levels and more. Check out what these four celebrities have to say about overcoming leakage and regaining their confidence throughout their experiences with incontinence:

Kris Jenner

Kris-Jenner

Best known for being the fearless leader of the Kardashian-Jenner family, Kris Jenner opened up to her fans about her life with urinary incontinence during an episode of the family’s reality television show, “Keeping up with the Kardashians.” After experiencing light leakage while exercising and laughing, Jenner decided to visit a doctor on camera. According to his observations, Jenner’s doctor concluded that she was experiencing stress incontinence and recommended pelvic exercises to help prevent leakage. The most important thing Jenner asks women with incontinence to remember? “People think they’re the only ones dealing with this. Light bladder leakage is not a big, bad monster, and it’s nothing to be ashamed of,” she said. “Once you prepare yourself, you can laugh and jump and sneeze, and do it with confidence.”

Chrissy Teigen

Chrissy-Teigen

Being a world-renowned supermodel and food author keeps Chrissy Teigen quite busy. But, recently, Teigen added yet another role to her resume — mother of two. Teigen and her husband, singer John Legend, welcomed their second child, a baby boy, this past May. She bravely opened up to the public about not only her struggles with postpartum depression, but also adjusting to postpartum incontinence. “No one told me I would be coming home in diapers, too,” Teigen said earlier this year on Twitter, referring to returning back home after giving birth to her son. However, this is quite common for mothers after giving birth. In fact, up to 50 percent of women experience changes in urinary control during and after pregnancy, according to Roger Goldberg, the director of urogynecology research at the University of Chicago’s NorthShore University HealthSystem. Simply, women experiencing postpartum incontinence are not alone.

Sheryl Underwood

Sheryl-Underwood

Comedian and talk show host Sheryl Underwood wants the world to know she is not ashamed of her urinary incontinence, something she has experienced for over ten years now. According to Underwood, she first noticed her leakage after her partial hysterectomy surgery. Being a young, successful comedian, Underwood needed a solution that could help keep her dry throughout the day, so she turned to incontinence products and hasn’t looked back since. “I wasn’t going to run from [incontinence]. Most people would feel a kind of concern,” she said. “You don’t want to have to worry. Most people would be ashamed. I’m not because this is now a regular part of my life.”

You should never feel alone throughout your experiences with incontinence. There is a warm, embracing community of people who are going through the same thing, from celebrities and business people to stay-at-home parents.

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Are Artificial Urinary Sphincters The Answer For Male Incontinence?

male-incontinence

Urinary incontinence affects many men and women across the globe, causing pain, discomfort, embarrassment, and a lower quality of life. However, in a recent study, doctors may have found a way to treat severe urinary incontinence in men. Artificial urinary sphincters might be the answer men with urinary incontinence have been looking for.

The Artificial Urinary Sphincter

For the first time ever, an artificial sphincter was used to treat a case of urinary incontinence in South Africa. To insert the urinary sphincter, a minimally invasive surgery is required. The device is implanted in the groin area and requires zero external parts for the utmost discretion. Behind this groundbreaking surgery is Dr. Johan Venter at the Netcare Pretoria East Hospital. Dr. Venter and his team led the surgery and requested this unique technology for one of his patients who suffered greatly from urinary incontinence. After the success of the surgery, Dr. Johan Venter and the hospital released a statement regarding the success behind the artificial urinary sphincter and believes that it is the answer for those who need help controlling their urinary incontinence–even if they experienced severe damage from an original urinary sphincter (non-artificial). Dr. Venter stated, “We are particularly impressed by this new-generation artificial urinary sphincter option, our investigations revealing that it was the best alternative available globally for cases like this. Some of the advantages it offers include that it’s easy for patients to use and does not require further invasive surgeries, should it require adjustment in the future” (source).    

Additionally, Dr. Venter explained that this innovative device is equipped with a pump that the patient can apply pressure to every time he needs to urinate. This pump is made of a soft silicone material and is very easy (and painless) for the patient to use. Additionally, this pump will deactivate the sphincter cuff, this way, the patient is able to urinate normally. However, just like any new device, there are a few factors that can cause damage to the sphincter. If the sphincter is damaged in any way, it can cause further damage to the pelvic wall, and even cause increased urinary and bowel problems. Therefore, doctors do head warning and advice patients to take it easy after surgery.

Advancing The Fight Against Urinary Incontinence

Regardless, this new device is a major step in the right direction for surgical and medicinal practices of urinary incontinence. Finally, doctors are able to provide patients with a way to subdue their urinary incontinence without requiring them to undergo ample surgeries or take a wild concoction of medicine. As time goes on, we are sure to see how well the new, artificial urinary sphincter treats urinary incontinence.  

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Yoga May Be Effective For Managing Urinary Incontinence

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Did you know that practicing yoga can help women reduce the frequency of urinary incontinence? New research presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association suggests that this form of meditative exercise is actually beneficial in fighting urinary incontinence. Since the principal of yoga is to achieve unity and improved control of the mind and body through physical strength and meditation, it serves as an excellent management strategy for urinary incontinence.

Urinary Incontinence in Women

Though it affects men as well, urinary incontinence predominantly affects women of all ages. Alison Huang, MD, an associate professor of medicine at the University of California San Francisco, explains, “Urinary incontinence is extremely common among women in midlife and beyond. One in three women over the age of 50 is estimated to experience incontinence on a weekly or more frequent basis. And yet, less than half of women suffering from this problem report receiving any clinical treatment” (source). Unfortunately, this is a reality for so many women.

Due to the nature of incontinence, women are too embarrassed to speak up about their condition and seek the right treatment. However, the women who do see specialists for incontinence are presented with a variety of treatment options that range from surgery all the way to major lifestyle changes. The course of treatment for this affliction can be very intimidating, which is why there’s such a high demand for alternative treatment methods. In her interview with Healio Family Medicine, Dr. Huang explains, “There is a real need for alternative approaches to treating or managing incontinence that are more accessible, more effective, and better tolerated by the over 20 million women in the US population who have this problem.” With this in mind, researchers decided to look at the potential benefits yoga could yield as a form of incontinence treatment.

Evidence from the Group-Based Yoga Program

Working closely with an expert yoga panel, researchers developed a group-based therapeutic yoga program that focused on specialized Iyengar-style technique. Iyengar-style is a form of yoga that focuses on the alignment of the body through the practice of precision. At the start of the study, patients were randomly assigned to either the yoga program or a nonspecific muscle strengthening and stretching program. It’s important to note that none of these women were previously enrolled in a yoga class or participating in any yoga-based workshops.

Of the participants, 56 women–of 65 years of age–were in the yoga group; all of whom claimed to have daily incontinence problems. As a part of the study, these women were instructed to attend classes on a weekly basis while practicing what they learned at home once a week for a total of 3 months. In total, 50 women completed the 30-day trial, and of those women, 75% attended more than 90% of the group classes and 88% completed more than 90% of the home practice hours.

From this data, researchers were able to determine a 75% decrease in frequency of urinary incontinence episodes amongst the women in the yoga group. Additionally, a 50% decrease in urinary incontinence episodes was recorded in the group of women who were assigned to the nonspecific muscle strengthening and stretching program. Although this was not a large-scale study, it’s evident that yoga yields beneficial results in the management of urinary incontinence. Many researchers believe that if such results are found within a larger study, more and more physicians will add yoga to the list of treatment methods for women who are afflicted with urinary incontinence on a daily basis.

The vSculpt May Help Women With Stress Incontinence

female-incontinenceAs we enter into the new year, doctors and medical researchers are discovering more and more ways to treat and relieve stress incontinence in both men and women. In their research, they noticed that stress incontinence and forms of sexual dysfunction are quite common in many women and even–on occasion–go hand in hand with one another. However, in the past few years, doctors have discovered a plethora of ways to treat both of these common afflictions, allowing women to find the reprieve they so desperately need and, ultimately, improving their overall quality of life.

A Common Occurrence In Women

Currently, 40% of women will experience some form of urinary incontinence at one point in their life, with the most common form being stress incontinence. Leaks from stress incontinence typically occur from coughing, sneezing, or from different forms of exercise or for many women, after childbirth.

As women age, urinary leakage tends to get worse, especially after menopause. To correct this troublesome issue, many doctors tend to recommend two different forms of treatment; conservative treatment such as lifestyle changes, weight loss, or medication, pelvic floor exercises or a more intense treatment course such as surgery.

Although pelvic floor exercises yield the highest results, it requires the training and monitoring of a physician or physical therapist to ensure that the patient is executing them properly. However, in light of the high demands of the NHS, many physiotherapists are overworked and boast long waiting lists and follow-up lists, which proves to be a problem for patients who desperately need help in controlling their urinary incontinence problems.

The vSculpt May Help

Due to the sheer number of women that deal with the issue, there have been recent  developments of medical devices that assist women with incontinence, with the latest device being the vSculpt.

The vSculpt is a device that’s inserted vaginally and uses multi-modal technology to improve the strength of a woman’s pelvic floor muscles. To do this, the vSculpt uses a combination of light therapy, heat, and therapeutic vibration. This combination works to restore both the tissue and the muscle of the pelvic floor and promotes better control over leaks and natural lubrication; both of which can help to improve not only urinary incontinence, but minor forms of sexual dysfunction as well.

To support this claim, the International Urogynecology Journal published a study that was conducted by doctors of Seattle, Washington. This study evaluated the patients who used the vSculpt for 45 days, 55 women total. At the end of the study, researchers examined the results by using a 1-hour pad weight test, pelvic floor muscle strength test, and a series of questionnaires that looked into the patient’s quality of life–with a concentration in stress incontinence and sexual function issues. Their studies yield significantly high results and showed that with this new device, women actually saw a vast improvement in both their urinary incontinence and sexual function problems, significantly improving their overall quality of life.

With these results, more and more doctors around the country are recommending the vSculpt as a minimally invasive treatment for urinary incontinence.

vSculpt is not available yet in the U.S, but you can learn more information about it here.

Urinary Incontinence Can Affect Teenagers Academically

teenage-incontinence

Did you know that urinary incontinence can affect the learning abilities and academic performance of teenagers?

Unfortunately, incontinence problems are one of the most common health issues that occur in young children–however, it’s an issue that can easily resolve itself over time. In a new study, researchers discovered that teenagers with incontinence problems have an even larger risk of struggling with their academics. With the constant need to use the bathroom and to struggle through the sometimes present symptoms of burning pain, it proves to be a difficult challenge to sit through class and pay attention to studies, which is why it’s highly important for teenagers to seek professional help as soon as they feel symptoms of incontinence issues.

Additionally, teenagers who are suffering from incontinence problems need to more help and support in order for them to succeed in all their academic endeavors.

Working Through Incontinence

Currently, urinary incontinence occurs in approximately 4% of teenagers, while only 1% suffer from bowel incontinence problems. In a study conducted by the University of Bristol,  researchers looked deeply into the impact of the middle school environment on young children with incontinence struggles in the UK. in the beginning stages of their study, researchers interviewed 20 children that were in between 11 and 19 years of age. These 11 girls and 9 boys each struggled from a range of continence issues–daytime bed wetting, soiling pants, leakage, etc.

Additionally, 17 out of the 20 children participated in full-time education practices. Here are the 5 reoccurring themes they discovered from their data intake:

  • Boundaries of disclosure amongst family members, friends, and teachers
  • Social consequences resulting from avoidance
  • The constant interruption from learning
  • Intimate actions in public areas (public restroom instances)
  • Strict and oblivious restroom rules (source)

Researchers discovered that many of these children suffered from the incapability of being able to confide in teachers, friends, and family members about their incontinence issues. They noted that this incapability derived from the fear of being bullied by other students. With this in mind, it’s extremely important for teachers and other school staff to become more aware of this issue–have the ability to catch onto the signs and symptoms–this way they can easily detect if a student is having a problem and be able to get them the help and support that they need. In addition to a teacher’s heightened awareness, officials believe that any student who suffers from this inconvenient issue should be able to have 100% unrestricted access to the bathroom at all times throughout the school day. Moving on, researchers also discovered that many of these students also experienced setbacks in school that resulted from their incontinence. Many claimed that their need to use the bathroom so frequently would take them away from their classes far too often–resulting in them falling behind and missing important information. Some even reported that they would leave a class from 3 to 4 times a day just to use the bathroom.

The Need For Incontinence Awareness

From this information, it’s so important to spread the awareness of the terrible symptoms incontinence. It’s very apparent that there needs to be a greater awareness for incontinence not only in the household, but at school as well. With a greater awareness for incontinence, as well as more lenient restroom rules, children who suffer from this medical issue will be able to find more comfort in school and have the help they need always be available to them–this will allow them to have 100% focus on their work, without the distraction of incontinence

The 5 Biggest Incontinence Triggers

urinary-incontinence

Urinary incontinence is the uncontrollable, sporadic leakage of urine due to a weakened urinary sphincter. Though this problem is widely known for to be a problem for the elderly, it’s actually an issue for millions of men and women across a spectrum of age groups. Unfortunately, living with urinary incontinence can be a daily battle that drastically affects one’s quality of life.

Avoiding the Biggest Incontinence Triggers

Let’s take a look at the 5 biggest incontinence triggers and how to avoid them.

1.Obesity

According to the NHS (National Health Service), obesity is a huge trigger in stress incontinence. The excess weight that is carried around by those who are obese has the ability to place a lot of pressure on one’s already weakened bladder. With extra pressure, the weakened bladder is more inclined to release urine in order to relieve the stress that’s being placed on it.

Losing weight, regimenting your diet, and taking part in daily exercise can do wonders in relieving stress incontinence due to obesity.

2.Alcohol

In many cases, consuming alcohol can be a major contributor to urge incontinence. Alcohol has the ability to stimulate the detrusor muscles–the group of muscles found in the wall of the bladder–to contract too often, leading to leakages.

Drinking less alcohol can help to alleviate the symptoms of urge incontinence.

3.Lack of Fluids

 Not drinking enough fluids on a regular basis–though it sounds counterintuitive–can be a major factor in incontinence. Without fluids like water to flush out the urine in your system, a build of very strong, concentrated urine can occur, irritating one’s bladder significantly.

4.Medications

If you read the label on some medications, you will notice that sometimes, some of the symptoms result in overactivity of the bladder. Many medications have the ability to disorder the regular process of passing and storing urine in one’s body; it even has the ability to increase urine production. Some medications that cause these symptoms include ACE inhibitors, antidepressants, sedatives, hormone replacement therapy meds, and diuretics.

If you suffer from incontinence and use the medications listed above, talk to your doctor to see what your best course of action would be.

5.Constipation

This is another popular trigger for urge incontinence due to its ability to cause a blockage in the bladder. To help ease the symptoms of constipation without using a diuretic, be sure to eat plenty of fiber, drink plenty of fluids, and keep active.

If you are noticing signs of incontinence that are unrelated to the above factors, be sure to contact your doctor for more information and for a more specific treatment plan.

At Wearever, we strive to make life easier for those that suffer with incontinence. Our incontinence panties, incontinence briefs, and reusable bed pads are quality products that you can rely on for sturdy protection.

Kegel Exercises Just Got A Lot More Fun

kegel-exercises

Kegels are an exercise that most women participate in order to manage their incontinence and strengthen their bladders. It’s a common misconception that Kegels are only done by women who have recently given birth as a way to strengthen their vaginal walls; however, this exercise is actually very commonly used to ease the symptoms of stress and urge incontinence.

Just recently, a new program has hit the shelves that are turning Kegels into a less boring and more fun exercise to take part in.

A Fun New Way to Complete Your Kegels

For those who are unfamiliar with Kegels or lead a very busy life, it can be hard to keep up with the exercise and remember the reps and counts you are supposed to do each day. Even for those who are very dedicated to building up their bladder strength by using a vaginal weight have trouble keeping up with the demands of the exercise–not to mention these small and sometimes expensive weights have a tendency to get misplaced far too often.

Now, a new Kegel exercise companion is on the market that is changing the way women are doing Kegels while promoting an altogether stronger vaginal wall and bladder.

Introducing the Perifit

The Perifit is a brand new, pelvic floor trainer that has the ability to send a Bluetooth signal to its accompanying app on your phone. When turned on, the app allows you play a fun video game that assists you in your Kegel exercises. And for those who are not tech savvy, don’t fret, because this trainer and app are very simple to use. The device itself is moderately sized and inconspicuous; lightweight and only 4 inches in length. It also comes with a small travel case and a guide to help new users get the hang of it. Once you have downloaded the app onto your phone, you will be able to choose the type of program that best fits your needs–i.e post-pregnancy, intimate well-being, and incontinence. From there, it will put together a 5-day treatment regimen based on your preferences.

The awesome part about this device is that the app is wired to your trainer. So, the games you are playing while using the device, are actually simulating it to move within you vaginal wall; helping you navigate the Kegel exercises. With each game you play, the tokens you collect, and levels you master, the device with expanding and contract, teaching you the ways of performing proper Kegels and therefore promoting ultimate bladder strength. Due to its small size and inconspicuous shape, this device is fairly simple to use when you are on the go. Many women even claim to use it while they are out and about and even wearing a skirt–however, we recommend that you only do this once you’ve mastered the Kegel technique.