Tag Archives: female incontinence

The vSculpt May Help Women With Stress Incontinence

female-incontinenceAs we enter into the new year, doctors and medical researchers are discovering more and more ways to treat and relieve stress incontinence in both men and women. In their research, they noticed that stress incontinence and forms of sexual dysfunction are quite common in many women and even–on occasion–go hand in hand with one another. However, in the past few years, doctors have discovered a plethora of ways to treat both of these common afflictions, allowing women to find the reprieve they so desperately need and, ultimately, improving their overall quality of life.

A Common Occurrence In Women

Currently, 40% of women will experience some form of urinary incontinence at one point in their life, with the most common form being stress incontinence. Leaks from stress incontinence typically occur from coughing, sneezing, or from different forms of exercise or for many women, after childbirth.

As women age, urinary leakage tends to get worse, especially after menopause. To correct this troublesome issue, many doctors tend to recommend two different forms of treatment; conservative treatment such as lifestyle changes, weight loss, or medication, pelvic floor exercises or a more intense treatment course such as surgery.

Although pelvic floor exercises yield the highest results, it requires the training and monitoring of a physician or physical therapist to ensure that the patient is executing them properly. However, in light of the high demands of the NHS, many physiotherapists are overworked and boast long waiting lists and follow-up lists, which proves to be a problem for patients who desperately need help in controlling their urinary incontinence problems.

The vSculpt May Help

Due to the sheer number of women that deal with the issue, there have been recent  developments of medical devices that assist women with incontinence, with the latest device being the vSculpt.

The vSculpt is a device that’s inserted vaginally and uses multi-modal technology to improve the strength of a woman’s pelvic floor muscles. To do this, the vSculpt uses a combination of light therapy, heat, and therapeutic vibration. This combination works to restore both the tissue and the muscle of the pelvic floor and promotes better control over leaks and natural lubrication; both of which can help to improve not only urinary incontinence, but minor forms of sexual dysfunction as well.

To support this claim, the International Urogynecology Journal published a study that was conducted by doctors of Seattle, Washington. This study evaluated the patients who used the vSculpt for 45 days, 55 women total. At the end of the study, researchers examined the results by using a 1-hour pad weight test, pelvic floor muscle strength test, and a series of questionnaires that looked into the patient’s quality of life–with a concentration in stress incontinence and sexual function issues. Their studies yield significantly high results and showed that with this new device, women actually saw a vast improvement in both their urinary incontinence and sexual function problems, significantly improving their overall quality of life.

With these results, more and more doctors around the country are recommending the vSculpt as a minimally invasive treatment for urinary incontinence.

vSculpt is not available yet in the U.S, but you can learn more information about it here.

New Incontinence Drug May Improve Sleep Quality

sleep-quality

In recent news, researchers at the University of California-San Francisco discovered a new drug that could inhibit the occurrence of urinary incontinence in women while greatly improving their quality of sleep. Those who suffer from urinary incontinence understand that this is an affliction that ceases to subside, no matter the time of day. Even in the deepest of sleep, episodes of incontinence can occur. Due to this, maintaining a regimented sleep cycle proves to be very difficult. Now, with the discovery of the new drug, fesoterodine, women who have incontinence will be able to rest easy at night knowing that their incontinence is being treated.

Putting Incontinence to Rest

Incontinence is a very common issue for women; especially those who have suffered frequent bladder infections, have given birth, are menopausal, or have a weakened bladder due to old age.

Due to its uncontrollable nature, many women’s sleep patterns are disrupted and their quality of life is greatly reduced. Leslee Subak, MD, professor and chair of obstetrics and gynecology states, “Two of the biggest quality-of-life factors for older women are poor sleep quality and incontinence, and the older you get, the more prevalent both conditions are, and they do seem to be correlated. And so, if we can find a drug to treat one and effectively decrease the other, too, that could be big for improving quality of life.” Luckily, with the determination from scientists and doctors from UCSF, that treatment has been made possible.

Back in 2012, researchers at the University of California-San Francisco conducted a study that looked into the effects a certain drug had on reducing the episodes of incontinence. Since incontinence is 5-10 times more common in women than men, researchers decided to revolve the study around women with incontinence. In their research, they discovered that the drug, fesoterodine, decreased the number of incontinence accidents while reducing the number of time participants woke up in the middle of the night to urinate. Fesoterodine is an antimuscarinic which helps to control accidental urination by blocking the receptors in the bladder.

Killing Two Birds With One Stone

Since fesoterodine proved to be efficient in preventing incidences of incontinence, researchers wanted to take it a step further and determine if it had beneficial effects for sleeping. To produce accurate results, researchers had their participants take part in a sleep evaluation, first–the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index is a self-reported evaluation that measures sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, the amount of time it takes for an individual to fall asleep at night, as well as 4 other sleep factors. Each category is scaled from 0 to 3 and totaled together at the end. Typically, the higher the score, the poorer the sleep quality–ranging from a score of 5 or more. In their study, they found that 57% of their participants recorded poor sleeping habits with an average score of 6.4. However, the women who were taking fesoterodine each night reported that slept much more soundly; only waking up to urinate once per night, if at all.

Since incontinence affects 25% of women who are in their 20’s and 30’s, 50% of women who are menopausal, and 80% of women who are 80 and up, the newly discovered medicinal effects fesoterodine has on sleep patterns and incontinence is truly groundbreaking. Not only will this new course of treatment help to soothe incontinence in women while bettering their sleep patterns, it will greatly increase their overall quality of life.  

New Device In UK To Help Women With Stress Incontinence

stress-incontinence

Did you know that in the United Kingdom alone, nearly 3 million women are afflicted with stress incontinence? Unfortunately, many of these women are too embarrassed by their problem and will not seek help for it. Lucky, the UK just developed a new device that can help women fight the stigma that follows being diagnosed with stress incontinence.

The Pessary That Can Change It All

Just a few weeks ago, the Scottish Fitness Expo released their new pessary called URESTA. URESTA is a small, reusable, rubber weight that has a shape of a bell. The purpose of URESTA is for women to use it as a way to successfully manage their symptoms of incontinence and avoid the tiresome, and embarrassing leaks that can occur throughout the day.

Women insert URESTA inside their pelvic region and use it throughout the day in everything they do; they can even exercise with it! Although URESTA is not very heavy, it provides women with enough weight to strengthen their bladder muscles as they use it, allowing for little to no urine to escape. Since URESTA is made primarily of rubber, it can easily be washed.

Urogynecologist Developed and Recommended

Originally designed and produced by Canadian urogynecologist, Scott Farrell, URESTA is currently being used by over 10,000 woman in Canada, alone.  Farrell made the prototype of URESTA out of plasticine from–surprisingly enough–his daughter’s toy box! Here’s what he had to say about his thought process for the creation of URESTA, “I had a patient a few years ago who was a bagpipe-player who leaked when she played. The pessary stopped it and she was able to continue in competition” (Source). So naturally, he then began to think of ways that the pessary could actually come in use for women.

Many of Dr. Farrell’s patients have experienced much success in improving their incontinence through the use of the pessary, URESTA. One woman even claimed that she was able to take part in all the activities she used to be able to do before the birth of her daughter. She claimed that she used URESTA almost every single day and it truly helped her regain much of the strength she needed in her bladder muscles.

Wael Agur, a urogyneocologist from Ayrshire and Arran, claimed that he as well gave URESTA to his patients with stress incontinence to use. Agur loves recommending this to women due to the simple fact that it provides these women with relief. Many are very embarrassed to share this problem with their doctor with fear that it means they will need dramatic surgery. However, this is not the case at all, and hopefully, with the development of URESTA, more and more women will be inclined to speak up to their doctor and share the issues they are dealing with involving stress incontinence.

In addition, the pessary is very much a self-managing tool, so women won’t have to make frequent doctors visits to check on their progress unless they really have a desire to.Not only does this inconspicuous and handy pessary help women to strengthen their bladder muscles, but it also provides them with the confidence they so rightly deserve.

Wearever Incontinence Products Help

While URESTA is an amazing development that may make it to the US, there are many ways to deal with incontinence currently. At Wearever, we pride ourselves on offering the best incontinence products for men and women. Check out our incontinence panties, incontinence briefs, and reusable bed pads for reliable protection.

Many Young Female Athletes Experience Incontinence

female-athlete

Many believe that incontinence is something that only elderly men and women deal with but in fact, incontinence affects people of all ages. In many cases, there are women who have given birth before who have incontinence, and even athletes–who don’t have children–suffer from it, too. It’s quite remarkable how diverse of a population incontinence affects.

Incontinence Among Female Athletes

In a recent study published in PubMed.gov, doctors found that more than one-quarter of collegiate female athletes–who do not have children–experience a form of incontinence while taking part in physical activity. Specifically, basketball players and gymnasts have shown to suffer the most from this ailment with 67% and 66%. Least affected were women who played softball, golf, volleyball, and swim.

In a different study, researchers found that 35% of female Olympic track and field athletes experienced leakage episodes during their competitions. Additionally, another study confirmed that out of 372 female Portuguese athletes, 30% showed signs of urinary incontinence.

Treating Athletes With Incontinence Is Different

The treatment for incontinence within athletes is not the same, and that’s where many are having issues. Many physicians will assign a treatment plan that is tailored towards  women who suffer from incontinence postpartum and this is a huge mistake.

The main cause of incontinence in new mothers is due to a weakened pelvic floor and the best way to build up that strength in through the continued practice of kegels. However, kegels are NOT recommended to be performed by athletes. Isa Herrera, a physical therapist and strength conditioning coach states, “For them, kegels can be the worst thing to do since it puts more pressure on an already disproportionately strained system” (Source).

The real problem comes down to their workout routine; in many athletes, the focus of their workout is to build a strong core (rock solid abs), but when this happens, many tend to neglect the internal muscle groups that surround it. Herrera claims that she sees this type of problem in athletes who tend to participate in a substantial amount of core and glute workouts, cycling, and P90X. Luckily, there are other forms of treatment that can be issued to female athletes who suffer from incontinence that does not involve the performance of kegels.

Tips For Female Athletes With Incontinence

If you are a female athlete that suffers from episodes of incontinence but are unsure of your next steps, here are a few tips to follow:

    1. Talk to someone: If you suffer from incontinence, there is absolutely nothing to be ashamed about; you are not alone. The most important thing at this point is to not brush it off as something insignificant. The longer you put it off, the worse it can potentially get. Speak up to a coach or a doctor and they can lead you to your next step.
  • You won’t have to cease exercise: A major concern in women with incontinence is that if they admit to this problem, they may have to discontinue their daily workouts until they are healed. That is a very common misconception and a mistake that many women make. You will not have to stop working out, but you may have to tweak your routine a bit. Doctors and physician recommend exercises that will help to stabilize the pelvic region. For example, using a vaginal weight while running or taking part in yoga.
  • Find the right doctor for you: For athletes, it’s paramount to find a doctor that specializes in the pelvic floor region as well as sports medicine for the best treatment results. You’ll find that many physicians will recommend that you practice a form of exercise called ‘lean and breath’. Basically, practicing leaning forward while running; this will improve the range of motion in your legs while relaxing the abdomen. At the same time, practice inhaling and expanding with your stomach instead of sucking it in. This will reduce any downward pressure that is being placed on your pelvic region

By using these tips to your advantage and talking to the right doctor, you will be able to manage and treat your incontinence while participating in your athletic activities.  

At Wearever Incontinence, we provide incontinence briefs, incontinence panties, and reusable bed pads that you can depend on for protection.

Running for Enjoyment Rather than to the Restroom

It’s no secret that running is extremely beneficial to your health. In addition to helping you stay fit, running also boosts mental health, prevents diseases and relieves stress. But did you know that as many as 30 percent of female runners report experiencing urinary incontinence while running? If that’s you, there’s no need to cancel your afternoon jog. Instead, check out these five tips for how to enjoy the miles without the worry:

  1. Kill the Urge with Kegels

kegel-exercise

When you have weakened pelvic muscles, the impact of your legs hitting the ground can cause leakage. Pelvic floor muscles can be strengthened through Kegel exercises, which luckily can be done anytime and anywhere.

  1. Cut Out the Coffee

no-coffee

If you have incontinence, consuming caffeine before a run can actually increase the urge to urinate, not suppress it. Caffeine is a natural stimulant and diuretic. Instead, make sure you get a good night’s sleep and are hydrated to enjoy the miles without emergency stops.

  1. Think about Timing

timing

To prevent any mishaps, time your fluid intake and bathroom visits throughout the day and before pounding the pavement. It’s recommended you visit the restroom every two to three hours before leaving to keep you on track.

  1. Gear Up for your Goals

athletic-clothing

As runners, we think a lot about how to make our time exercising as successful as possible. Careful consideration is put into everything from our sneakers to our earphones. Wearing the right clothing can make a big difference in achieving your distance and time goals. Our comfortable and breathable incontinence panties and briefs allow you to keep your focus on reaching the finish line.

  1. Slow and Steady Wins the Race

As you work on strengthening your pelvic floor, you might want to consider taking things slow during a jog. When we move faster, we are more likely to have poor form and our body struggles to compensate. While you put effort into bolstering your muscles, consider decreasing your pace.

Incontinence shouldn’t stop you from enjoying exercise. Check out this blog post for more on how incontinence can affect physical activity and steps you can take to mitigate its impact.

Staying Fit May Help Reduce the Risk of Incontinence in Women

incontinence-in-women

What if you could take precautionary measures that would reduce your risk of incontinence and better manage it? Women generally have weaker pelvic muscles than males which means they are more susceptible to dealing with incontinence. Through working out and staying fit, women can discover that as their muscles strengthen, so does the reduction of incontinence issues.

The Study

In a recent study conducted, almost 1,500 elderly females who suffered from stress or urge incontinence were surveyed. The results of the three-year long study concluded that women who kept their weight down and partook in muscle-strengthening exercises experienced lower amounts of incontinence incidents (Source). Whether it is yoga, pilates, light jogging, or swimming, staying fit and working your pelvic muscles lessens the chance of incontinence issues. As women work these muscles out, they are strengthening the muscles around the urethra and bladder, making it less likely for unexpected urine to pass through.

Managing Your Weight Helps

Having an overactive bladder is a common issue that many women face. Through taking your weight and active lifestyle into your own hands, you can better manage the side effects of incontinence.

Studies have proven that managing BMI (Body Mass Index) and keeping those numbers in check, is inherently beneficial to managing incontinence. The unnecessary weight that is put on the pelvic muscles adds additional pressure to the area. In turn, the chance of incontinence is heightened, and leakage is more likely to incur. “By reducing weight and abdominal fat there is less pressure on the bladder resulting in less stress urinary incontinence,” said Dr. Cindy Amundsen of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. “Better muscle strength may be associated with higher pelvic floor muscle strength and function, decreasing the susceptibility to urine leakage” (Source).

Daily urinary incontinence affects nearly 12 percent of women ages 60-64 in America: that is significant. By making some lifestyle alterations, women can better manage their incontinence. Walking more, eating less, and breathing in the fresh air are all easy, simple, and enjoyable ways to control leakage. Urinary incontinence is a widespread grievance among many women and through keeping your BMI and health in check, you can better manage this issue. Beneficial alterations in one’s body composition will keep you living a long and prosperous life.

Wearever Incontinence Products Help With the Unexpected

Even when you are trying your best in preventing urine accidents, leakage may still occur unexpectedly. Wearever incontinence panties provide protection that you can always rely on in. Wearever incontinence bed pads also work effectively in preventing any accidents while you sleep from ruining your bed.