Is The O-Shot Effective Against Incontinence?

Urinary incontinence transpires when a person’s urinary sphincter grows weak and in turn, leads to involuntary, and unexpected leakage of urine on a daily basis. This is a problem that affects many people but occurs most frequently in women of all ages. Though incontinence is highly prevalent in the elderly, it can also affect women who have experienced pregnancy, menopause, and other related medical conditions.

According to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 25% of premenopausal women, 50% of middle-aged women or postmenopausal women, and 75% of elderly women suffer from incontinence. With such a high percentage of women suffering from incontinence, researchers have estimated that nearly $19.5 billion has been spent on a plethora of treatments, including surgery, in the effort to reduce the symptoms.

Just recently, a new treatment for stress incontinence was discovered and doctors are calling it the O-Shot. This new treatment has peaked the interest in many women who are plagued by incontinence and are in search for any means necessary to end their involuntary leaks.  

How the O-Shot Works

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The O-Shot is an injection that is made from platelet-rich plasma that is directly taken from the patient’s blood and spun together. Due to its properties and yellow hue, doctors are calling the plasma, ‘liquid gold’. A doctor starts by drawing blood from the patient’s arm and place it in a centrifuge. After time, the centrifuge separates the red blood cells from the plasma.

Dr. Beverly Mikes explains that the plasma produced is rich with growth factors that promote cells to increase their production of elastin–a protein found in the dermis of the skin–collagen, and vasculature and nerves (Source). The plasma then helps to regenerate and stimulate new tissue which in turn, treats stress incontinence.

Once this process is completed, the doctor administers a topical numbing cream followed by an injection of a local anesthetic and injects four cc’s of the liquid gold into the vaginal wall and the remaining 1 cc into the clitoris. Women who have received this treatment must keep in mind that results are not immediate and any signs of noticeable improvement may take a while.

A data bank maintained by the O-Shot’s founder Dr. Charles Runels has shown that there is a 65% success rate within three months of the injection. If there are still no signs of improvement within the three months, doctors recommend that the patient receive a second shot. The data bank notes an 85% success rate for those who were administered a second shot.

For women who have experienced reduced incontinence symptoms in the O-Shot treatment, it is recommended to receive yearly injections. Currently, a single treatment of the O-Shot is priced at $1,500 and is not covered by insurance. 

 

Not Enough Research

Like any experimental branch of medicine that has been newly discovered, questions and controversy have followed the development of the O-Shot.

As eager as many women are to try out this new treatment, the lack of peer-reviewed scientific evidence is leaving many questioning its effectiveness and its level of risk. Unfortunately, due to the insufficient scientific data, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have yet to include the O-Shot treatment in its Practice Bulletin for Urinary Incontinence in Women. Obstetricians and Gynecologists are advising their patients to heed caution to the O-Shot due to the placebo effect. Many women who suffer from urinary incontinence are very embarrassed to admit that they have this problem–even though it is more common than most believe it to be. Because of this, there is a heightened chance of the placebo effect occurring. Sometimes, all it takes is one woman’s positive testimony of the procedure to convince the rest that the treatment will work just as well for them. Hopefully, as time passes and more research is conducted, obstetricians and gynecologists can officially deem the O-Shot as an effective treatment for urinary incontinence.

There Are Many Ways To Manage Incontinence

Until more research is done, doctors recommend that patients practice pelvic muscle training to make your bladder and pelvic muscles strong enough to stop an unexpected leakage. Surgery, medication, and behavior therapy are recommended to those with extreme and debilitating cases of incontinence.

For extra protection from incontinence, we at Wearever have the all the supplies you need. Our incontinence underwear for men and incontinence panties are discrete, durable, fashionable, economically priced, and can go right in the wash after each use. For overnight protection, Wearever has a selection of washable bed pads to choose from that are long-lasting and will keep your bed dry. Wearever has you covered from those unexpected leaks.