Category Archives: Incontinence

Some Antidepressants and Incontinence Drugs Have Been Tied to Dementia

antidepressants

In a recent study, a variety of commonly used antidepressants and incontinence prescriptions have been found to increase the risk of dementia in patients. Many researchers even claim that the connection between these two medications and dementia is still prevalent even if the medication was taken 20 years before the diagnosis was made. This startling discovery was made in a study conducted by researchers from the United States, Britain, and Ireland.

A Substantial Increase In Dementia Risk

In this extensive study, researchers looked at the 27 million prescriptions that were given to the 40,770 participants (that were over the age of 65) who were previously diagnosed with dementia between April 2006 and July 2015 (source). After carefully collecting and examining this data, the researchers compared their results with 283,933 elderly adults who didn’t have dementia. From that comparison, they found that there was a 30% increase in the risk of developing dementia after taking the prescribed medicine.

The Effects of Anticholinergics and Antidepressants

However, there was a drug that stood out the most amongst the rest: anticholinergics. Anticholinergics are prescribed to those for a variety of diseases such as depression, gastrointestinal disorders, urinary incontinence, allergies, Parkinson’s disease, and epilepsy. Anticholinergics work to block acetylcholine–a nervous system neurotransmitter–and have been known to contribute to various cognitive impairments.

Also found in their study, 35% of participants with dementia and 30% of participants without dementia were found to have at least one prescription that contained anticholinergics. Additionally, researchers found noticed another link to dementia: the consistent exposure to antidepressant, urological, and antiparkinson drugs. In addition to this finding, researchers noted that participants noticed signs of dementia at least 15 to 20 years before the actual diagnosis. Even more startling, at the start of drug treatment for depression, only 12% of patients developed dementia; however, during drug treatment, that percentage increased to 20%.

With these findings, many researchers and doctors are recommending for medical providers to avoid prescribing any medications that might contain anticholinergics.This includes Dr. Ian Maidment, a senior lecturer in clinical pharmacy at Aston University.

Dr. Chris Fox, a professor of clinical psychiatry at UEA’s Norwich Medical School explains, “We don’t know exactly how anticholinergics might cause dementia. Further research is needed to understand possible reasons for this link. In the meantime, I strongly advise patients with any concerns to continue taking their medicines until they have consulted their doctor or pharmacist.”

Although the relationship between dementia and anticholinergics haven’t been clearly defined, researchers are diligently working to discover it’s exact link. In the meantime, it’s pertinent for patients to pay close attention to the contents of the depression or urinary incontinence medications.  

A Stroke May Increase The Risk of Urgency Urinary Incontinence

urinary-incontinence

Both doctors and scientists alike have discovered many different causes of urinary incontinence. However, recently, research results from a Medical Research Council National Survey for Health and Development birth cohort, discovered the risk of developing urinary incontinence after experiencing a stroke. The researchers behind this study believe that strokes or transient ischemic attacks (TIA) could be a significant risk factor for urgency urinary incontinence (source).

The Study

The 1,762 participants for this study needed to be over the age of 68 with a previous history of stroke or TIA–a temporary block of blood flow to the brain, also known as mini strokes–at the age of 60 to 64 years. Researchers discovered that these participants were actually twice as susceptible to developing urgency urinary incontinence in comparison to those who didn’t have a history of strokes or transient ischemic attacks.

Additionally, their research also lined up with previous studies that looked at BMI (body mass index) as a contributing factor to forms of urinary incontinence. Their results showed that with each standard deviation increment in a participant’s body mass index, their odds of contracting urgency urinary incontinence was 19% higher. However, in female participants who showed signs of stress urinary incontinence, they were 1.8 times likely to develop forms of urgency urinary incontinence. In total, their study determined that the prevalence of developing urgency urinary incontinence at the age of 68 in their male participants was 12%, while their female participants of 68 years of age was 19%.

Researchers also noted that in cases of severely debilitating forms urgency urinary incontinence, the above-defined risk factors were actually much stronger. Even before experiencing a stroke or transient ischemic attacks, participants were still at 3.6 times greater risk of developing symptoms of severe urgency urinary incontinence. However, researchers never found the same association with mild forms of UUI. Although, they did discover that forms of hypertension (high blood pressure) in men 60 to 64 years of age contributed to a 1.6 greater risk in developing urgency urinary incontinence; this statistic was not found in women.

Taking a closer look at their women participants, researchers concluded that there was little to no association between urgency urinary incontinence and menopause of hormone replacement therapy. They also determined that there was no connection between smoking, physical activity, and UUI.

As you can see, there are very many contributing factors to signs and symptoms of urinary incontinence, especially in urgency urinary incontinence. Although previous history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks plays a significant role in one’s susceptibility to urgency urinary incontinence, factors such as hypertension and BMI can also determine one’s vulnerability to UUI.  

Urinary Incontinence Can Affect Teenagers Academically

teenage-incontinence

Did you know that urinary incontinence can affect the learning abilities and academic performance of teenagers?

Unfortunately, incontinence problems are one of the most common health issues that occur in young children–however, it’s an issue that can easily resolve itself over time. In a new study, researchers discovered that teenagers with incontinence problems have an even larger risk of struggling with their academics. With the constant need to use the bathroom and to struggle through the sometimes present symptoms of burning pain, it proves to be a difficult challenge to sit through class and pay attention to studies, which is why it’s highly important for teenagers to seek professional help as soon as they feel symptoms of incontinence issues.

Additionally, teenagers who are suffering from incontinence problems need to more help and support in order for them to succeed in all their academic endeavors.

Working Through Incontinence

Currently, urinary incontinence occurs in approximately 4% of teenagers, while only 1% suffer from bowel incontinence problems. In a study conducted by the University of Bristol,  researchers looked deeply into the impact of the middle school environment on young children with incontinence struggles in the UK. in the beginning stages of their study, researchers interviewed 20 children that were in between 11 and 19 years of age. These 11 girls and 9 boys each struggled from a range of continence issues–daytime bed wetting, soiling pants, leakage, etc.

Additionally, 17 out of the 20 children participated in full-time education practices. Here are the 5 reoccurring themes they discovered from their data intake:

  • Boundaries of disclosure amongst family members, friends, and teachers
  • Social consequences resulting from avoidance
  • The constant interruption from learning
  • Intimate actions in public areas (public restroom instances)
  • Strict and oblivious restroom rules (source)

Researchers discovered that many of these children suffered from the incapability of being able to confide in teachers, friends, and family members about their incontinence issues. They noted that this incapability derived from the fear of being bullied by other students. With this in mind, it’s extremely important for teachers and other school staff to become more aware of this issue–have the ability to catch onto the signs and symptoms–this way they can easily detect if a student is having a problem and be able to get them the help and support that they need. In addition to a teacher’s heightened awareness, officials believe that any student who suffers from this inconvenient issue should be able to have 100% unrestricted access to the bathroom at all times throughout the school day. Moving on, researchers also discovered that many of these students also experienced setbacks in school that resulted from their incontinence. Many claimed that their need to use the bathroom so frequently would take them away from their classes far too often–resulting in them falling behind and missing important information. Some even reported that they would leave a class from 3 to 4 times a day just to use the bathroom.

The Need For Incontinence Awareness

From this information, it’s so important to spread the awareness of the terrible symptoms incontinence. It’s very apparent that there needs to be a greater awareness for incontinence not only in the household, but at school as well. With a greater awareness for incontinence, as well as more lenient restroom rules, children who suffer from this medical issue will be able to find more comfort in school and have the help they need always be available to them–this will allow them to have 100% focus on their work, without the distraction of incontinence

The 5 Biggest Incontinence Triggers

urinary-incontinence

Urinary incontinence is the uncontrollable, sporadic leakage of urine due to a weakened urinary sphincter. Though this problem is widely known for to be a problem for the elderly, it’s actually an issue for millions of men and women across a spectrum of age groups. Unfortunately, living with urinary incontinence can be a daily battle that drastically affects one’s quality of life.

Avoiding the Biggest Incontinence Triggers

Let’s take a look at the 5 biggest incontinence triggers and how to avoid them.

1.Obesity

According to the NHS (National Health Service), obesity is a huge trigger in stress incontinence. The excess weight that is carried around by those who are obese has the ability to place a lot of pressure on one’s already weakened bladder. With extra pressure, the weakened bladder is more inclined to release urine in order to relieve the stress that’s being placed on it.

Losing weight, regimenting your diet, and taking part in daily exercise can do wonders in relieving stress incontinence due to obesity.

2.Alcohol

In many cases, consuming alcohol can be a major contributor to urge incontinence. Alcohol has the ability to stimulate the detrusor muscles–the group of muscles found in the wall of the bladder–to contract too often, leading to leakages.

Drinking less alcohol can help to alleviate the symptoms of urge incontinence.

3.Lack of Fluids

 Not drinking enough fluids on a regular basis–though it sounds counterintuitive–can be a major factor in incontinence. Without fluids like water to flush out the urine in your system, a build of very strong, concentrated urine can occur, irritating one’s bladder significantly.

4.Medications

If you read the label on some medications, you will notice that sometimes, some of the symptoms result in overactivity of the bladder. Many medications have the ability to disorder the regular process of passing and storing urine in one’s body; it even has the ability to increase urine production. Some medications that cause these symptoms include ACE inhibitors, antidepressants, sedatives, hormone replacement therapy meds, and diuretics.

If you suffer from incontinence and use the medications listed above, talk to your doctor to see what your best course of action would be.

5.Constipation

This is another popular trigger for urge incontinence due to its ability to cause a blockage in the bladder. To help ease the symptoms of constipation without using a diuretic, be sure to eat plenty of fiber, drink plenty of fluids, and keep active.

If you are noticing signs of incontinence that are unrelated to the above factors, be sure to contact your doctor for more information and for a more specific treatment plan.

At Wearever, we strive to make life easier for those that suffer with incontinence. Our incontinence panties, incontinence briefs, and reusable bed pads are quality products that you can rely on for sturdy protection.

Dealing With Incontinence and Depression

incontinence-and-depression

Depression is quite a common disease that affects the minds of many people around the world, and it surely isn’t selective when it comes to age.

Though incontinence is a medical condition that affects the function of one’s bladder, it’s no secret that the effects it has–mentally–on patients can be very similar to ways in which depression does.

Additionally, incontinence impacts both men and women of all ages. Just battling one of these diseases is challenging enough, but unfortunately, this combination is not uncommon. More are more scientists are noticing that there is a strong link between clinical depression and bladder problems such as incontinence.

Treating your Depression and Incontinence Together

Dealing with both depression and incontinence at the same time can be extraordinarily taxing on one’s physical and mental health. That’s why is it so important to have a full understanding of both of these conditions (talking to a professional) in order to live your best life. Unfortunately, many of those who suffer from incontinence are too embarrassed to admit they are dealing with such a problem. Due to that discomfort, their condition goes untreated and undetected by doctors. Those who suffer from incontinence and don’t receive the treatment they need will find many different ways to hide their problem from their friends and family. As time goes on, they become more and more reclusive, disconnected, and disengaged. This, unfortunately, is where depression and anxiety rear their ugly heads.

When depression and anxiety set it from the awful side effects of incontinence, it’s easier for those who suffer from it to allow it control their lives; it’s an ugly disease that knows no limits or boundaries. It’s understandable that getting help from a doctor is easier said than done, but for the sake of your mental and physical health, it is extremely important; depression and incontinence can be managed. The first place to start would be with a urologist. Once you have seen them and they have given you a treatment plan for your incontinence, then make it a point to schedule a visit with a psychiatrist regarding your depression. Fortunately, many patients have found that once they were able to get their incontinence in control, their episodes of depression began to diminish.

In the meantime, here are some helpful tips on ways to treat both your incontinence and your depression simultaneously:

    • Improve your diet:  What you put into your body has a direct effect on both your mind and bladder. We know it sounds crazy, but trust us, it’s true. The first thing you should cut out of your diet are things like caffeine, alcohol, and sweeteners (drinks that have a negative impact on your bladder). Always remember to drink plenty of water and eat foods that contain fiber.
  • Lose weight: Obesity is a major factor in the development of stress incontinence. By losing weight, your path to an incontinence-free life can be easily achieved. Start off by walking as much as possible–taking the stairs instead of an elevator or escalator. You should take part in 30 minutes of cardio per day.
  • Take part in pelvic floor exercises: Pelvic floor exercises are the easiest way to build strength in your bladder muscles. Stronger bladder muscles will result in fewer incontinence leakages.
  • Use incontinence products: There is absolutely nothing wrong with wearing incontinence products as a backup while on your road to recovery. Sometimes, it’s nice to have some peace of mind while going through a major lifestyle change.
  • Talk to your doctor regularly: We cannot stress enough the importance of talking to a doctor on a regular basis. Your doctor is the best person to speak with regarding any advice you may need or questions you have about your incontinence and even your depression.
  • Practice bladder training: This is an exercise that you can do from the comfort of your own home. When you have the urge to go to the bathroom, try to hold your bladder for a few seconds longer than you normally would. As time goes on, try to increase the amount of time you hold your bladder, little by little. For extra protection, always wear incontinence underwear.
  • Manage stress: Stress plays a major role in the development of depression and it can also have a negative effect on your incontinence. Try to take time throughout the day to do the things you enjoy the most. Even deep breathing exercises can help!

If you find that these tips are not assisting you in the ways you need them to, talk to your doctor about a treatment plan that will work best for your specific needs. Remember incontinence is treatable, Depression is treatable and you should never be ashamed of having it.

Running for Enjoyment Rather than to the Restroom

It’s no secret that running is extremely beneficial to your health. In addition to helping you stay fit, running also boosts mental health, prevents diseases and relieves stress. But did you know that as many as 30 percent of female runners report experiencing urinary incontinence while running? If that’s you, there’s no need to cancel your afternoon jog. Instead, check out these five tips for how to enjoy the miles without the worry:

  1. Kill the Urge with Kegels

kegel-exercise

When you have weakened pelvic muscles, the impact of your legs hitting the ground can cause leakage. Pelvic floor muscles can be strengthened through Kegel exercises, which luckily can be done anytime and anywhere.

  1. Cut Out the Coffee

no-coffee

If you have incontinence, consuming caffeine before a run can actually increase the urge to urinate, not suppress it. Caffeine is a natural stimulant and diuretic. Instead, make sure you get a good night’s sleep and are hydrated to enjoy the miles without emergency stops.

  1. Think about Timing

timing

To prevent any mishaps, time your fluid intake and bathroom visits throughout the day and before pounding the pavement. It’s recommended you visit the restroom every two to three hours before leaving to keep you on track.

  1. Gear Up for your Goals

athletic-clothing

As runners, we think a lot about how to make our time exercising as successful as possible. Careful consideration is put into everything from our sneakers to our earphones. Wearing the right clothing can make a big difference in achieving your distance and time goals. Our comfortable and breathable incontinence panties and briefs allow you to keep your focus on reaching the finish line.

  1. Slow and Steady Wins the Race

As you work on strengthening your pelvic floor, you might want to consider taking things slow during a jog. When we move faster, we are more likely to have poor form and our body struggles to compensate. While you put effort into bolstering your muscles, consider decreasing your pace.

Incontinence shouldn’t stop you from enjoying exercise. Check out this blog post for more on how incontinence can affect physical activity and steps you can take to mitigate its impact.

Fecal Incontinence Is More Common Than You Think

fecal-incontinence

When we think of incontinence, we often associate it with unwanted and unintentional urine leakage.

However, fecal incontinence is almost as prevalent as urinary incontinence yet is rarely discussed. Incontinence can affect anyone, regardless of age or gender and could be due to hereditary factors or other health-induced reasons.

The Prevalence of Fecal Incontinence

Did you know that 24 percent of men and 17 percent of women experience fecal incontinence?

That means that almost one in five adults have, at one point or another, experienced fecal incontinence (Source).

Fecal incontinence could be accompanied by other bowel issues such as: constipation, gas and bloating, and diarrhea.

Factors That Cause Fecal Incontinence

Damage to the anal sphincter muscles

Sphincter muscles work to hold stool within the body. When these muscles are damaged, they become weak and fail to hold stool in resulting in fecal incontinence. A common cause of this is an injury sustained during childbirth. With the intense pressure that this area endures, damage to the anal sphincter muscles is common.

Pelvic nerve damage

When pelvic muscles are damaged, it can severely affect your ability to sense when you have to use the bathroom.

Reduction in rectum elasticity

There are various things that can lessen the resilience of the flexibility of the bowel. This could be hereditary or as a result of surgery or childbirth.

Dementia

Fecal incontinence tends to be prevalent in those suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s due to the inability to control bowl movements.

Fecal incontinence is also referred to as Accidental Bowl Loss (ABL) and is too infrequently discussed with doctors and physicians.

If you suffer from fecal incontinence, it is absolutely nothing to be ashamed about. Treatments are available that will supply you with relief of your symptoms so that you can lead a normal everyday life. Speak to your doctor or physician today and start a journey toward a better quality of life that is free from the worries of incontinence.

Wearever provides a a variety of products that help you manage incontinence. Check out our incontinence panties, incontinence briefs, and reusable bed pads.

Menopausal Hormone Therapy Has Been Linked to Fecal Incontinence

menopausal-hormone-therapy

Around the age of 55, women go through menopause and it is a natural part of aging. Since this can be a trying time in a female’s life, many of them have a difficult time adjusting to the emotional side effects of ever-changing moods and sentiment.

As a result, women tend to seek relief which may come in different forms such as from various vitamins, medications, supplements, and even menopausal hormone therapy. These methods can relieve them of the hot flashes and sweating that are a side effect of menopause. But little do these women know, menopausal hormone therapy may actually have negative adverse effects such as fecal incontinence.

Recent Studies on Menopausal Hormone Therapy

New data has emerged regarding the association of fecal incontinence and menopausal hormone therapy.

A group of 55,828 postmenopausal women with an average age of 73 were analyzed. The study discovered that “women who were past users of menopausal hormone therapy were about 26% more likely to develop incontinence (HR, 1.26) when compared to those who never used hormone therapy” (Source). In turn, more and more research is going into whether or not this treatment option is safe enough to suggest to patients.  

The Risks Involved

Although hormone therapy (HT) is government-approved and designed to alleviate menopausal symptoms, it does come with some risks as well.

One of the biggest risks associated with HT is prolonged usage coupled with a high doses. The healthiest alternative would be to take the lowest dose for the shortest amount of time. Prolonged use of HT has been linked to fecal incontinence which may cause more downfalls than benefits for some.

Aside from the possibility of developing fecal incontinence as result of Menopausal Hormone Therapy, there are other significant risks such as: strokes, blood clots, heart attacks, and breast cancer.

“The longer you’re on hormone therapy, the higher your risk for fecal incontinence and the longer you’re off, the more that risk attenuates. I think this says to clinicians that they need to evaluate each time they see that patient whether she still needs to be on hormone therapy at that time”, states Dt. Staller,  a neurogastroenterologist and motility specialist at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (Source).

If you are considering choosing menopausal hormone therapy as a way of regulating your symptoms, it may be worth reconsidering. Weighing the pros and cons of this alternative will help you to better understand whether or not menopausal hormone therapy is right for you.

Customer Review Of Our Smooth and Silky Seamless Incontinence Panties

incontinence panties

Urinary incontinence is extremely common in women after they give birth. However, worrying about an accident is the last thing that a new mom needs on her plate. Our panties provide comfort to mothers, so they can ditch the fear and get back to caring for their little ones!

Tiffany Frelo from RealTalkforRealWomen recently tried out our Smooth & Silky Seamless Full-Cut Incontinence Panties for the first time and shared her thoughts about the product on her blog:

“I really like these underwear. After having my daughter any cough, sneeze or laugh, and I pee my pants a little bit. These help to keep that moisture and don’t leave an odor. It’s like having a built-in panty liner. And they are smooth, silky and seamless. [They are] definitely something ever mommy needs in her underwear drawer.”

Thank you for sharing your opinion, Tiffany! We always appreciate hearing how our products can help people feel more comfortable and confident in all they do! To read her full blog post, click here.

Incontinence May Be Preventing People From Exercising

incontinence-exercise

Incontinence affects nearly 25 million adults in the U.S., almost 80% of those being females (Source). Contrary to being such a prevalent disorder, many people wait an average 6.5 years before consulting their condition with a doctor.

Incontinence can interfere with one’s ability to live a regular life, due to fear leakage accidents. In turn, this involuntary leakage may result in people becoming withdrawn from social activity as well as physical activity.

The Effect That Incontinence Has On Exercise

There is a time in everyone’s life when physical ability and stamina degrades noticeably as this is the effect of getting older. This is amplified when one has incontinence.

Studies reveal that urinary incontinence is preventing people from exercising, but this does not have to be the case (Source). The trick to regulating urinary incontinence is to manage its symptoms, as Science Daily reports, which is relatively simple to do. This would include doing exercises that suit the condition. Since urinary incontinence generally does negatively affect people’s lives, it’s important to make them aware that lack of exercise will only make the side effects worse.

Another study suggests that women who didn’t experience a decline in muscle strength over the three year study period were less likely to suffer from stress incontinence (Source). When the abdomen area experiences pressure, the likelihood of leaking is high, but diminishes over time with exercise. Women over the age of 70 have a reduced risk of incontinence if they simply maintain their grip strength and muscle mass as they get older (Source

Having incontinence is no reason to refrain from physical activity. Getting your heart pumping and blood flowing is a great way to boost metabolism, increase longevity, and reduce incontinence symptoms.

The side affects of aging are never enjoyable, but lacking physical activity due to incontinence will only make you age quicker. Did you know that partaking in just 30 minutes of physical activity per day will actually help manage and regulate incontinence issues?

Exercises To Help Manage Incontinence

Some great workouts that will keep you keep fit while managing your incontinence are:

  • Kegel exercises
  • Pelvic floor exercises
  • Squeeze and hold muscles for five seconds, repeat
  • Yoga
  • Pilates

Quality Incontinence Products From Wearever

At Wearever, we are doing our part to help those with incontinence live better lives. Our incontinence briefs, incontinence panties, and reusable bed pads provide the protection you need while you are working on managing your incontinence.